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Find the correct download on the official Monero website and go to your downloads folder. Open the terminal and use this command: sha256sum monero-linux-x64-v0.10.3.0.tar.bz2 If you receive the following output you will know that the hash matches the GPG signed message listing the correct SHA256 sums ...


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An AES round uses the three functions (SubBytes, ShiftRows and MixColumns). The Wikipedia article on AES has a high-level description of the algorithm and links to the AES standard, reference source code, etc.


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There's no need to worry about duplicating nonces between miners/pools because they construct the block header, which contains the merkle root of all txs in the block, one of which is the coinbase tx that will payout to the miner/pool. So, the block header is different for every miner, so no need to worry about duplicating nonces. As knaccc points out in ...


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Windows also has a built-in command-line tool to check hashes. First, using Windows Explorer, navigate to the folder to which you downloaded monero-win-x64-v0.10.3.0.zip. Then, shift + right-click somewhere on the background (don't select any files) and select Open command window here. You'll be presented with the console which will start in the same ...


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Jun Li's answer is correct. You can also use the '-c' (for check) option to sha256sum to verify the hash without manually comparing hash strings, but you have to extract the hash line from the hashes.txt file first, because of this bug. The steps are: Download the monero-linux-x64-v0.10.3.0.tar.bz2 and hashes.txt files Copy the relevant line from hashes....


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Download and install the Quick Hash GUI Open the program, select SHA256 then select file and find monero-win-x64-v0.10.3.0.zip in your downloads folder If you receive the following output you will know that the hash matches the GPG signed message listing the correct SHA256 sums 37a57d1be81b6119ac06d3f637b4c56fc625f3e790f3491c1bdca4d62902bf13


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The scratchpad is filled with pseudo-random data based on the state (using rounds of the AES block cipher). Check https://cryptonote.org/cns/cns008.txt for a detailed description of the algorithm (without the modifications introduced in version 7 of the protocol).


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With Powershell Get-FileHash cmdlet: PS> Get-FileHash monero-win-x64-v0.10.3.0.zip -Algorithm SHA256 The full check could be: PS> '37a57d1be81b6119ac06d3f637b4c56fc625f3e790f3491c1bdca4d62902bf13' -eq >> (Get-FileHash monero-win-x64-v0.10.3.0.zip -Algorithm SHA256 | >> Select-Object -ExpandProperty Hash)


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You can find the difficulty of a submitted hash (which is just a big endian hex encoded string) by dividing the base difficulty (2^256-1) by your hash. As such, nodejs-pool (the most common pool software), checks your submitted hash difficulty as follows: let hashArray = hash.toByteArray().reverse(); let hashNum = bignum.fromBuffer(new Buffer(hashArray)); ...


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They announced support on Twitter back in April: https://twitter.com/coinhive_com/status/981102585460543489


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The process for Linux and FreeBSD is similar to that for macOS, described here: How can I verify the SHA256 hash of 0.10.3 “Wolfram Warptangent” on macOS? For FreeBSD, use the command sha256sum <filename> in the terminal and compare the output to the checksums on the Monero webpage.


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On macOS: Downloading the tar.bz file. I will assume it is located in the normal "Downloads" directory, and it's name is monero-mac-x64-v0.10.3.1.tar.bz2. Other names/locations are fine but you'll have to adjust the process accordingly. Open Terminal. Easiest way is ⌘+spacebar and type "Terminal", then hit enter. Change to the Downloads directory. Type cd ~/...


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Monero uses keccak-256, where 256 refers to the bit length of the hash produced. Note that SHA-3-256 is slightly different, and so will not produce the same result as keccak-256. This library will produce the correct hash: https://www.npmjs.com/package/keccak


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Do it against the downloaded file. I used the command: sha256sum <my_file_here> It will then spit out a hash string. Copy this string and then do a find on that same webpage to see if it matches. It was pretty easy. Took less than 30 seconds to figure out.


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The hash_accepted field is the response from the proxy server for when a hash is acknowledged by the server the hashes field is the number of hashes the worker has submitted in the past. When the server gets a new connection it sets it up like so: var conn = { uid: null, pid: crypto.randomBytes(12).toString("hex"), workerId: null, found: 0, ...


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The hashes.txt file seems to be badly formatted and has 2 spaces between the filename and the hash, making the sha256sum command look for the wrong file (it's prepended with a space). If everything is downloaded into same folder, you can do: sed 's/ / /g' hashes.txt | sha256sum -c The sed command fixes the double spaces "on-the-fly". The output will look ...


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