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15

A high pool difficulty is for high power mining equipment. What this does is lowers the bandwidth amount for both the pool and the miner. Because the difficulty is higher, the miner will find valid shares less frequently, resulting in less data transmitted from the miner to the pool. Lower difficulties are for lower powered mining equipment, so that the ...


12

Usually that error means the share your miner submitted was garbage, and didn't actually verify on the pool. Sometimes it means the share was submitted too late, and the pool has already moved on to the next block. But if you keep getting it over and over, then your miner code is broken (or you're using the wrong algorithm).


10

There are at least 13 pools but likely more due to private and unkown pools Not yet, but there has been some interest in the idea It does not exist for Monero but it would be a nice little project to create one. The main reason people don't seem to go for it is higher overhead. You have to run a full node, and you have to run what is essentially a ...


10

A mining pool spreads the risk/reward of hitting a block, so you'll get more consistent results--though you'll likely pay an administration fee. Think of it in terms of a lottery pool. If every week you put in $10 and the total is $100 in your lottery pool, you'll get 10% of the winning payout--minus any administration fees. Whereas if you buy $10 of ...


10

Solo mining requires running a full node, pool mining does not. Also, when solo mining, it will usually take much longer to find a block when compared to a pool. Pools do charge a fee, normally 1-2% of the block reward. When pool mining on a Windows PC, I use less than 20 Mb/day download and less than 5 Mb/day upload. Solo mining will be more bandwidth ...


9

It seems like a certain number of steps or confirmations needed when a block is found by a pool (I guess it's the same when mining solo), but I can't be sure. This is exactly right. When a block is mined, it cannot be spent until 60 blocks after it has been mined (with a 2 minute block time, this means roughly 2 hours). The same applies when solo mining. ...


9

When you mine, you try to solve a puzzle. In a simple description, you choose a number, any number, hash it together with some info for the block you want to include in the blockchain, and then check if the resulting hash conforms to the rules. This puzzle is designed in such a way that a difficulty level can be set for its solution. When you mine for the ...


9

Nothing special to do if you're pool mining. Most pools just use your address as your "account name" and don't care if one device or 100 are mining to that address. As an example, some miners periodically point their miner to the Dev's donation address as a way to contribute. A small caveat... it could be best to pick one pool and devote all your resources ...


9

Miners will lose what they would have gained if the pool had been on the right fork: any block mined on the wrong fork will eventually get reorganized away. If the pool's on the wrong fork, any money from the wrong chain it sends miners will be just that: on the wrong chain. It will therefore only appear in wallets running the wrong chain. This will ...


8

This is a proxy for "did we get lucky or not". The shares numerator is the total number of weighted shares sent by miners trying to find the block. When you mine, you're asked to solve an easier problem on that block template (and if you solve it with a large enough gap, you find the block). When you find one of those "subblocks", you submit it to the pool, ...


8

https://monerohash.com/#network is a pretty good visualisation of the state of Monero mining. It also has some basic stats on nodes, and the blocks the monerohash pool has found.


7

Why is there no P2Pool for miners? Because no one has developed it yet. Additionally, a 2 minute block time is very difficult to work with for a p2pool system. AFAIK, the p2pool system works because there are 30 second blocks in the p2ool sharechain, while there are 10 minute blocks in the bitcoin main chain. So, every 30 seconds there is an agreement ...


7

Solo and pool mining should give out similar reward in the long term, with a few notable differences: pools typically have a fee, varying from 0% to 2%. working with a pool incurs some small delays (ie, the pool has to send miners a message telling them about a new block, etc), which can waste some small amount of hashrate pools have a payout threshold to ...


7

When a block is found, the block reward is divided among the miners, pro rata with the difficulty weighted shares they submitted for this block. This is done by the pool software's own accounting, not on chain. On chain transactions only happen when a miner's pending balance reaches the payment threshold. At that point, some amount (based on the ...


6

Answering whether a mining pool (or anything in the cryptocurrency space) is safe is an especially tough challenge, but I will try to look at the things that you should consider if you are evaluating a pool's trustworthiness. First, let's look at the pool's size: moneropool.com currently has a reported hashrate of ~517 kH/s out of a total network hashrate ...


6

The 100% part of the message means that you are connected only to nodes with at most that height, which is far in the past. Try print_cn and see if you have any peers, and how many. This is odd that you'd be connected to only bad peers. To try to fix the problem: exit monerod remove ~/.bitmonero/p2pstate.bin start monerod again This will cause monerod to ...


6

You cannot compute a block's difficulty from its hash. The hash is a Keccak hash. A different hash using Cryptonight is used for PoW purposes, but this isn't the block hash. It is often called the PoW hash, or just PoW. It uses a similar system to Bitcoin where the hash as an integer must be below some treshold based on difficulty. This hash is run on the "...


6

Pool miners talk to pools using JSON over HTTP. This is a fairly simple protocol, which is different from the one used by Bitcoin miners, but similar. I don't know of a documentation for it, but you can easily see what it's doing by looking at cpu-miner.c in Wolf's miner (copy found on github, not the original): https://github.com/okae/cpu_miner_wolf/blob/...


5

Here is the answer when it comes to Bitcoin mining pools. https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/10693 TL;DR: The miner will find a valid hash based on the merkle root provided initially by the pool. Once a solution is found, the miner will submit it to the owner. The owner would not be able to change the transactions (to divert the BTC to their own address) ...


5

Assuming you refer to pool mining... This question was partially answered here: Does mining use a lot of bandwidth? 20 Mb/day download and less than 5 Mb/day upload So over a month, that's ~750 MB combined. So a 1 GB 4G plan would be more than adequate. As for latency, the general rule is that you want the minimum latency possible. Any latency in your ...


5

You want tsiv's ccminer-cryptonight. I've never successfully compiled it on macOS, and don't have a mac desktop anymore to test it on, but I believe a few recent Issues on github answer this question... https://github.com/tsiv/ccminer-cryptonight/issues/9 https://github.com/tsiv/ccminer-cryptonight/issues/6 Your best bet is to try to follow the build ...


5

If you have limited linux skills, i suggest you try Monerodo, which is an ubuntu with a bunch of monero software pre-installed, including a pool software. Otherwise, you can start looking at zone117x node-cryptonote-pool. Either way, you will have to tweak the software to implement the "voting" part. As to the cost, it can be as free as submitting a PR :...


5

As far as I understand, rewards of pool mining are devided by the miners of the pool. So I will get 1 XMR with 1 KH/sec in about 1 week, if I start mining now. That's right. But if you solo-mine, it could become 3 days or 2 weeks, depending on nothing but luck. With a pool, you're almost guaranteed to accumulate 1 XMR at the end of the week, when you add up ...


5

If the pool has variable difficulty like most pools do mining with high end hardware should not be a problem as the difficulty will adjust based off the shares your hardware submits. If the pool has a high payment threshold for those with low end mining hardware may not be feasible. It should not matter how many miners a pool. It is more to do with hashrate ...


5

Mining Blob The mining blob is the block header + merkle root + number of TX-es. It's similar to block identifier as defined in CNS003: Calculation of Block Identifier The identifier of a block is the result of hashing the following data with Keccak: size of [block_header, Merkle root hash, and the number of transactions] in bytes (varint)...


5

The reward per valid share will be: block_reward * (1-pool_fees) / valid_shares


4

When the pool I am mining finds a block what does the "Shares/Diff" number represent? I would need the source to be 100% sure but with the context provided I believe that is a measure of (work done by pool miners/blocks difficulty). Work (hashes generated) by the pools miners is proportional to the number of weighted shares generated by miners while ...


4

You can start the same command line one each machine and it will work. However, if you have hardwares with significant difference in hashrate, it may be better to target a specific difficulty. That can be done by choosing the pool port and/or, if the pool handles it, by specifying a worker id. From dwarfpool http://dwarfpool.com/xmr : You can determine ...


4

I don't know of any open source Monero pool software that has an API, so most pools do not have API's. The only way to get the stats from these pools would be to scrape the data using a web parsing tool, or building one yourself.


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