21

The short answer is no, at least not safely. Something we've discussed before is for full nodes to (completely optionally) include a donation address in their handshake, with separate addresses on clearnet and i2p (to prevent fingerprinting). Then when a wallet is building a transaction it can ask the daemon for a random donation address from the list of ...


12

One of the pros for a smooth curve is to avoid the arbitrary sudden changes. A second, more subtle, reason is to allow a block size penalty. In most Cryptonote coins, including Monero, it is possible for a miner to create blocks up to the current block size limit (that block size limit is variable, based on the recent history). However, if the block size is ...


10

Make Monero useful and people will run nodes. You don't need to compensate nodes to give people an incentive to run one, you just need to make Monero intrinsic or a large part of their business. This is why Bitcoin nodes have been going down over the years, no business sees it as critical to their revenue model, so they outsource it. DNMs are a perfect ...


9

TL;DR Actually, with the current minimum fee, there's an incentive for 0.6% growth as long as there's enough transactions coming in. Problem is not in the formulas themselves, but in the typical transaction size / min. block size ratio. The penalty formula has an optimum block size increase for a set of transactions offering any given fee, see figure below. ...


8

In addition to the excellent summary by ArticMine already given, here below is shortened & updated version of my research on the topic. Dynamic Blocksize Penalty This is the penalty which will be subtracted from the block reward. In practice it means that whenever a penalty is triggered, the start of tail emission will be slightly postponed (it will ...


8

This limit is based on the median of the last 100 blocks' size, after removing outliers, with a 60 kB lower limit (so blocks can't get TOO small, or you could have a hard time "restarting"). This allows the block size to grow and contract based on transaction volume. The size at which the block reward penalty kicks in is between 100% and 200% of the block ...


7

Pretty much anything could be done. I'd been thinking about a block tree, where you'd have geographically [1] close miners mining at a low difficulty and low block time, and making their own quick chain. Every, say, 10 blocks, they'd hash their blocks (or 10 blocks in the recent past, to guard against reorgs) and a higher level set of miners would have a ...


6

The 60 kB limit is the minimum median block size limit. Thus, miners are able to construct blocks up to 60 kB without incurring a penalty. This limit was increased from 20 kB in the March 23, 2016 hardfork and was first proposed by smooth. From the proposal: The minimum median block size is current 20 KB, meaning without the dynamic block size kicking in, ...


6

the miner, who found the block, will be rewarded with some Moneros, in the expenses of the sender. That also happens, and it is called a transaction fee. Transaction fees are small: 0.002 XMR (per output, or Kb, I am not sure). On the other hand, what you are observing is the block reward of about 10 XMR per block found which seems wasteful at first glance,...


4

It depends on the pool. Every mining pool will have a slightly different set of rules. Generally speaking they pay you on the amount of shares your miner submitted, and then do some type of formula involving the difficulty of those shares vs the rest of the pool (to determine your actual % of contribution) then once they get that %, thats what you'll get ...


3

0.13.0.4 can not understand the current consensus rules, so it's essentially playing in its own abandoned playpen. You never found any Monero. It's a bit similar to participating in a bike race, taking a wrong turn and somehow ending up on last week's bike race's circuit and going over that finish line that's still chalked on the ground. You did not win that ...


3

It is spendable. There are a lot of clones which use the genesis block reward as premined coins


3

As a miner finds shares, each share's difficulty accumulates on that miner's "account". When the pool finds a block, all miners' accumulated shares are reset to 0, and the cycle restarts till the pool finds a block again. Upon finding a block, the block reward (minus the pool fee) is distributed to miners in proportion to their accumulated share ...


3

As pointed in other answers, it's important that there's enough nodes. But that doesn't mean that everyone must run one, or that there needs to be a direct incentive. I believe there will always be enough nodes. To understand why, we must first understand what nodes are for. Nodes are what guarantees certainty of a cryptocurrency's properties. They check ...


3

I do not believe that nodes need to be compensated. With Monero, "mixing" is done on the blockchain, not by nodes. Monero nodes provide the same service that Bitcoin nodes do; they keep a copy of the blockchain and share it with the network. Some people have theorized that without a block reward, people will not run full nodes. When looking at Bitcoin, we ...


3

An old idea that came back recently is to have nodes offer their services for a fee. A price + integrated address would be included in the handshake, and a client could be setup to accept prices up to a certain threshold. Then, a wallet could pay that price, and the node would allow services for a connection which includes that same payment id in its ...


3

It helps prevent supply shocks, like which Bitcoin experiences. This means that the hashrate is going to remain stable as the block rewards diminishes. I'm pretty sure this is also necessary for the tail emission and deferral of block rewards for the blocksize flexcap, as a blockreward penalty when blocks get progressively larger means that the block reward ...


3

After 18 million coins or by may 2022 the last block would be mined After ~18 million coins, the last pre-tail emission block will be mined. After this, all blocks mined will have a block reward of 0.6 Monero. Who will receive this tail emission? The miners who mine the blocks.


3

Monero has a "smooth" emission. This means the block reward decreases gradually until it hits 0.3 XMR per minute. Subsequently, the tail emission kicks in and the block reward will remain 0.3 XMR per minute indefinitely. This will occur in approximately 2023. Note that the tail emission is not inherent to CryptoNote, but was specifically implemented in ...


3

Is there a way to track blocks generated by a pool? The pool implementation you are using includes an API endpoint which reports blocks mined. It's registered at /api/pool/blocks by default. E.g. https://supportxmr.com/api/pool/blocks What are the possible explanations of such behavior? At 15 kh/s, finding a block in 48 hours at current network ...


2

If the rules are the same as on the main network, you need to wait 60 blocks (ca. 2 hours) to see the balance unlocked for coins that you mine. For normal transactions, the balance is locked for 10 blocks only (ca. 20 minutes).


2

chainradar doesn't show RingCT transaction fees (they are explicitly defined rather than sum(inputs) - sum(outputs), and they clearly haven't added support for that). Try http://moneroblocks.info/search/1233057


2

But I fail to see how a miner, who just "packs" transactions in a block, can control the size of the blocks he or she mines. Exactly like that. You pack until you get to the target size. Then, you simply don't pack the rest of the queue and leave it for the next block. Or you swap low fee tx-es with ones with higher fee, still keeping the size below the ...


2

This is arbitrary, and the pool chooses what they are confident with. Some number of confirmations are needed to ensure the pool really has the mined monero before they pay miners. If a pool were to pay miners as soon as it mines a block, it would risk that block being orphaned (ie, another block takes its place on the chain), and it would have paid money ...


2

Monero does not use the height, but that doesn't mean a fork cannot. Just pass the block height to get_block_reward (in src/cryptonote_basic/cryptonote_basic_impl.cpp) and you're set. Don't forget to update the tests :)


2

This does not control the money supply, contrary to what you might expect. If you want to cap it, you need to change get_block_reward (in src/cryptonote_basic/cryptonote_basic_impl.cpp) and stop emission when your chosen amount of coins is reached.


2

The coinbase transaction has a single placeholder input - one of special type, unlike the usual "from key" inputs you see on other transactions. The log you supplied shows only outputs. A coinbase transaction may have more than one output, since before rct outputs were split by denomination in order to make ring signatures work better. If this had not been ...


2

If you start solo mining, any block reward you find will appear in your wallet automatically, without any further action needed on your part. As a reminder, if you exit the daemon, you will have to start mining again, as the GUI merely instructs the dameon to mine. Note that the likelihood of finding a block solo mining on an average computer is pretty ...


2

To target a block time of a day, difficulty would be adjusted to make the likelihood of finding a block require a days worth of hashing (work). The big drawback to such a large block time would be slow confirmation of transactions.


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