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7

Of course it doesn't work for Monero, because Monero is not a fork of Bitcoin. For mining profit, the simplest would be the following: Daily mining estimate = ( (your hashrate) * (current block reward) * 720 ) / (network hashrate) Note that you can't use Bitcoin hashrate for this, as it is a different alghorithm (CryptoNight). For example, a RX 470 will ...


7

From Wiki it says around 18.4 Million at the end of May 2022. However, tail emission will kick in after that which is 0.6 XMR, so it has no fixed limit. Its main emission curve will issue about 18.4 million coins to be mined in approximately 8 years. (more precisely 18.132 Million coins by ca. end of May 2022[) After that, a constant "tail emission" of ...


7

Solo and pool mining should give out similar reward in the long term, with a few notable differences: pools typically have a fee, varying from 0% to 2%. working with a pool incurs some small delays (ie, the pool has to send miners a message telling them about a new block, etc), which can waste some small amount of hashrate pools have a payout threshold to ...


6

I think the CryptoNote website's page about the egalitarian proof of work is about the inner working of the hash function, not about how the hash of a block is computed (which is basically cn_slow_hash(block_header + tree_hash(block_transaction_hashes)) as you thought). Internally, the Scrypt function computes blocks of pseudo-random data. Something like: ...


6

The site itself says they've used WebAssembly to compile C code to Javascript. This means you'd need to be competent in C in order to attempt this feat. If you work through the numbers though, the revenue you'd get from asking your visitors to mine Monero will be tiny compared to the advertising revenue you could get instead. I'd also imagine Google will ...


6

I think you would have to do a lot to get a miner running on a pi. The CPU doesn't have much cache, isn’t that strong, and would need the AES-NI instruction set (which not all Pi s have). And it would get a very low H/s anyway. There's a GPU on the pi but I haven't seen much info about using it for mining. However since the power is free it could be fun just ...


6

When mining on a VPS drops, the likely reason is that you either got throttled by the admin, or your VM shares hardware with other VMs which are competing for the CPU time. If this VPS provider can migrate VMs on other hardware, it might also be the case that the previous hardware had (and exposed to guests) AES-NI instructions, and the new one does not. ...


6

Pools do not know your hash rate, they can only estimate it based on the shares you submit. Since finding those shares is in inherently random process, you will sometimes have lucky breaks, and sometimes long dry spells. This will translate to a randomly changing hash rate being reported by the pool. Your miner knows the rate at which it is hashing, so ...


5

Yes, kind of. Your model is an idealized representation of mining, and works with one exception. The network has a certain degree of latency between nodes, and as a result miners do not know immediately when another miners finds a block, but rather have to wait something like 1-10 seconds before learning about a new block. Now, at first glance,this might not ...


5

As far as I understand, rewards of pool mining are devided by the miners of the pool. So I will get 1 XMR with 1 KH/sec in about 1 week, if I start mining now. That's right. But if you solo-mine, it could become 3 days or 2 weeks, depending on nothing but luck. With a pool, you're almost guaranteed to accumulate 1 XMR at the end of the week, when you add up ...


5

If you have limited linux skills, i suggest you try Monerodo, which is an ubuntu with a bunch of monero software pre-installed, including a pool software. Otherwise, you can start looking at zone117x node-cryptonote-pool. Either way, you will have to tweak the software to implement the "voting" part. As to the cost, it can be as free as submitting a PR :...


5

As far as I understand, this is to make sure that the coins were mined on the longest blockchain, and thus the longer "delay" of 60 blocks is meant as a safeguard against transactions becoming invalid because of blockchain reorganizations. These might change several dozens of blocks sometimes. While 60 blocks should typically be enough, I have seen some ...


5

Cryptonight, the Proof-of-Work (PoW) algorithm used by Monero, uses a 2 MB buffer to do its calculations. Mining speed is heavily influenced by whether this buffer can fit in your CPU's cache. If it can't, some reads and writes will hit RAM, and slow it down. Therefore, to determine the optimal number of mining threads (at least as far as cache is concerned),...


5

The getbklocktemplate RPC returns a blockhashing_blob and a blocktemplate_blob. You can either try to find a nonce (4 bytes) by mining using the blockhashing_blob, or you can try to find two nonces (4 bytes in the block header, reserved_size bytes in the extra field of the mining reward transaction) using the blocktemplate_blob and computing the transaction ...


5

Mining Blob The mining blob is the block header + merkle root + number of TX-es. It's similar to block identifier as defined in CNS003: Calculation of Block Identifier The identifier of a block is the result of hashing the following data with Keccak: size of [block_header, Merkle root hash, and the number of transactions] in bytes (varint)...


5

Actually, the AMD Radeon VEGA cards, both 56 and 64, are the best options for mining Monero. Nothing is comparable to VEGA and with fine tuning you can reach really high hashrate (about 2000H/s) with really low TDP. To understand how to config VEGA and miners, useful sources are: Monero and Vega - the definitive guide Vega Mining - A Consolidated Guide ...


5

cn_slow_hash is CryptoNight. cn_fast_hash is Keccak. As the names imply, the former is much slower than the latter. Both hash a contiguous buffer. Cryptonight is used for PoW and KDF, while Keccak is used for everything else. tree_hash is a merkle tree hasher: it works on a binary tree of hashes, and uses cn_fast_hash for the actual buffer hashing.


5

The reward per valid share will be: block_reward * (1-pool_fees) / valid_shares


5

There are many ways to help the Monero both directly and indirectly. Run a full node to directly support the network Donate to the Monero Forum Funding System Join a Monero workgroup for mining, support, or any others Participate in many of the Monero forums, such as here on the Stackexchange, on Reddit, Quora, etc Learn as much about Monero as you can so ...


5

Using the monero-wallet-cli this is a breeze. Start the wallet with your miner wallet: monero-wallet-cli --wallet-file miner-wallet Then execute: show_transfers coinbase Which will list all coinbase (i.e. block reward) transfers. The first column in the output has the block height.


4

Yes, RingCT transactions are much bigger than non-RingCT transactions. The monthly blockchain growth has already more than doubled in comparison to December 2016, when RingCT hasn't been enabled yet. Why are you hosting more than one full node at home? You just need one full node and all your local machines can connect to it via local network.


4

GPU mining configurations often use the cheapest CPU. Thus, your CPU should be powerful enough to work with 3 Rx 480. Yes, PCIE x 1 should work for mining but you have to buy a riser (recommended to use a powered riser). RX 480 draws around 150W (from specification) - 200W. Probably give some more allowance when buying your Power Supply and don't go cheap ...


4

You are confused. The 8+0 does not mean this. The difference between the two types of connections are who initiated it: your daemon, or a peer. Data can flow in both directions, regardless of whether it was initiated locally or by a peer. This also means that mining does not need incoming connections. It can work as well with or without. Not allowing ...


4

What matters is where the last block was found, and this is due to latency. So if the last block was found on a pool server in new york, another pool server located in new york will be notified of the new block a lot faster than a pool located in france. Granted, we're talking on the scale of milliseconds here, but if you do the napkin calculations of a 1 ...


4

Because it's not economic for the pool or miner. There's also a "hard" cap (which goes up with median) at 2x the median. If a miner mines a too big of a block, he loses some base block reward (emission) and for it to be economic to him, the fees must be high enough to compensate and earn a little more. Each wallet fee level corresponds to a % increase ...


4

A same seed will restore the same wallet. Checking the address is a good way to check that you got your seed right. For example, the seed tanks ticket muffin eclipse lectures degrees gymnast technical deodorant hefty lunar casket zapped bovine skater bypass frying acquire inkling ammo army myriad soggy tepid hefty will always result in the address ...


4

According to these benchmarks, K620 is supose to get around 120 H/s http://monerobenchmarks.info/ (threads 32, block 6s) Also XEON E3-1271 gets 338 H/s So yes, its probably correct. But you can always tweak it a little bit.


4

The extra reserved bytes are taken into consideration to compute the block hash. There are 4 bytes reserved for a nonce in the block header (the nonce that appears in the hashing blob). In addition, you can reserve extra bytes (reserve_size) for a second nonce in the extra field of the block reward transaction. It allows searching for a nonce giving a ...


4

Each thread requires 2MiB of memory. That's because an instance of CryptoNight hash function requires a 2MiB scratchpad. If it can all fit in CPU cache it's way faster since RAM is very slow compared to CPU cache. So, divide your CPU cache with 2 and you'll get the optimal number of threads. First, the input is hashed using Keccak [KECCAK] with parameters ...


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