21

Starting with v0.10.1, there is now a command print_coinbase_tx_sum that give you this information.


17

An incomplete list of explorers with unique features would include Moneroblocks, ChainRadar, and The Onion Monero Blockchain Explorer, of which the clearnet version can be found here. Moneroblocks is the most popular explorer (and one of the first if you include its previous .eu domain). It tracks a number of useful statistics, such as mixin usage and ...


15

The best general tool for this is http://moneroblocks.info/. It is somewhat comparable to the Bitcoin site https://blockchain.info/, and you can conduct searches using a number of different identifiers. However, if you are focusing on a specific transaction, I think your best bet might actually be a very useful tool developed by one of our community ...


13

There is no such command. However, it'd be easy to add. Feel free to add a request for this on https://github.com/monero-project/bitmonero/issues


7

The view key would not allow you to prove you made that transaction. To prove that you sent those monero to Alice you'd need to provide the Tx Private Key, the recipient's address and the transaction hash to the people you want to prove that the payment was made. You have to setup your wallet to save the Tx Private Keys using a switch that I can't really ...


6

Usually, empty blocks can vary within a couple bytes, as monero amounts (present in the coinbase transaction even in "empty" blocks) are stored in a varying length encoding. 1157856, however, is a lot larger because it's got extra info in the extra field. It's probably been mined by MinerGate, who tends to add their own private information in blocks.


6

I propose the following with simple bash scripting using curl and jq. First, install jq (to parse json) macOS: brew install jq Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install jq Others at https://stedolan.github.io/jq/download/ Then, write a simple bash script Using the moneroclub public node: #!/bin/bash INFO=($(curl -sS -X POST http://node.moneroclub.com:8880/json_rpc -...


6

In addition to MoneroBlocks, ChainRadar and the Onion Monero Blockchain Explorer description from 2quick 4u, there is another new explorer worth mentioning: Monero Explorer offers: Charts including difficulty, hash rate, market price and tx volume with plans to expand data range options Poloniex XMR price and volume data Tx logs from recent blocks Check Tx ...


5

There is a bitmonerod command, output_histogram [[mincount] maxcount], which lists (amount, instances) pairs of outputs on the blockchain. The output is sorted by instances. output_histogram takes an optional first parameter, which is an instances count minimum cutoff. That is, it will display all amounts with at least that many instances. The second ...


5

Currently, I am using ruby to parse the JSON returned from moneroblocks.info: ruby << END_OF_RUBY require 'open-uri' require 'json' open ("http://moneroblocks.info/api/get_stats/") { |src| puts JSON.parse(src.read)["height"] } END_OF_RUBY Which right nows returns: 1140328


5

Yes there is, and people do host it themselves, and for others: You can download it here: https://github.com/moneroexamples/onion-monero-blockchain-explorer An example running is here: http://explore.moneroworld.com/


5

Using the monero-wallet-cli this is a breeze. Start the wallet with your miner wallet: monero-wallet-cli --wallet-file miner-wallet Then execute: show_transfers coinbase Which will list all coinbase (i.e. block reward) transfers. The first column in the output has the block height.


4

The block height refers to the most recent block that has been mined. The block number refers to any block up until and including the current block height. Blockchain exploring sites are generally slightly behind on listing the most current block height. When you use the status argument, the first values returned are [currently synced block]/[current block ...


4

You can see the public keys for your outputs with: incoming_transfers verbose For spent ones, or unspent ones, respectively: incoming_transfers verbose unavailable or incoming_transfers verbose available Verbose mode will also give you the key image for each output.


4

This is not really Monero specific. You would do the usual. Try HTTPS (it cuts down on the number of attacks), check with and without Tor, maybe even with more than one exit node, and compare certificates. If the explorer does not support HTTPS, you could diff the HTML you got from Tor and non Tor connections, and check the only changes are things like ...


4

If you have a daemon running on your own machine, use: height=$(monerod print_height) This will save the height as the shell variable $height. I see now that the question was for using a block explorer. Oh well.


4

This is the blockchain growth (MB) per month since inception: +--------+---------+ | size | month | +--------+---------+ | 15.25 | 2014-04 | | 159.60 | 2014-05 | | 424.98 | 2014-06 | | 202.63 | 2014-07 | | 227.67 | 2014-08 | | 155.52 | 2014-09 | | 102.11 | 2014-10 | | 83.77 | 2014-11 | | 103.33 | 2014-12 | | 74.76 | 2015-01 | | 71.97 | 2015-02 | | ...


3

You can check this block explorer (according to this reddit post) : http://xmrtestbbzl275vy.onion/ tor2web proxy: http://xmrtestbbzl275vy.onion.link/


3

You did not mention which pool or block explorer you are using but the answer is likely related to two things: Time zone reported by the pool or explorer explains the 19:xx vs 21:xx two hour difference in your example. Each pool and Block explorer uses a different node. Depending on which peers a node is connected to and network latency there can be a small ...


3

There is the Onion Monero Blockchain Explorer. The README says it's open source but no license is explicitly mentioned.


3

I'm not sure if you understand the CryptoNote protocol sufficiently. If not, the whitepaper should probably be the first resource for you to consult with. RingCT was first published in MRL-0005, but some of the details are different in the current implementation. I have made several posts trying to understand (and explain) how RingCT works: Questions ...


2

You can print the total coin supply with the command print_coinbase_tx_sum However, this assumes that there were no issues with transaction construction. In this case, the supply can be audited afterwards to see if there were any errors. Here is the information for a vulnerability that was found with Monero and patched before exploitation: In Monero we'...


2

This question has a fundamental misunderstanding of money supply and the link with coinbase transactions. You would be right in a perfectly secure system, the coinbase transactions are the only way to add coins to the money supply. The reality however is different. Bugs in the protocol (like the infamous keyimage bug that allowed the creation of infinite ...


2

This site has statistics and graphics on Monero transactions. It has 5 graphs, Transactions count (all), Transaction counts (per period), Transaction fees, Transaction outputs (sum), Transactions size (average). From these graphs you should be able to infer if the Monero network is much busier on certain times of the day.


2

Yes, the Onion Monero Blockchain Explorer supports RingCT. Currently it is: the only explorer supporting Monero testnet network and RingCT, More blockexplorers may add support in the coming weeks but I am not aware of any specific announcements.


2

It would appear that you spent less than 0.6 XMR in this transaction. You must have received a 0.6 XMR denomination in the past, which remained an unspent output in your wallet until now. That output was used as the input for the current transaction. It was mixed with 8 other unspent outputs, so no one but you knows which was sent by you. Note the output ...


2

Outputs are where amounts of Monero are "stored". The blockchain consists of a set of transactions. Each transaction spends existing outputs and creates new outputs (typically one new output for the recipient and another new output to send change back to yourself). Each output has an amount of Monero associated with it. The output also has a unique public ...


1

The blockchain is viewed as a typical C array. It is an ordered collection of blocks of size N, containing blocks with indices 0 to N-1 (for example, a blockchain of size 2 contains blocks 0 and 1). The term "height" is used to indicate the "distance" from the origin (the genesis block) as well as the size of the blockchain. So the height of the blockchain ...


1

Synchronizing time across machines is difficult due to clock drift and network latencies. The timestamp of a block in Monero is specified by the miner, and the nodes only enforce that the timestamp of a new block is greater than the median of the last 60 blocks. If the nodes used their local clock to enforce timestamp, there would be some risk of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible