12

Monero originally required a lot of RAM, because it stored the blockchain in RAM. Currently, Monero uses LMDB to store its blockchain. As a result, people are able to set up Monero nodes with only 512MB of RAM. When running, bitmonerod (the daemon) uses less than 100 MB of RAM. For Zerocash the requirement will be much higher for nodes that generate spend (...


10

Since Monero moved to LMDB in January, RAM requirements are now quite low. It is possible to run a full node with 1GB of RAM The amount of hard drive space needed will vary by OS. I have not yet seen a blockchain over 20GB. The blockchain continues to grow, but pruning options (such as provided by Aeon a Monero fork) will likely become available eventually A ...


5

There were several changes: https://github.com/monero-project/monero/pull/1727 This patch splits block and transaction data getters in two: one which retrieves the data, and the other also doing some parsing and reconstruction of the block or transaction. This allows skipping all the parsing (and reserializing) where it is not needed, which is mainly when ...


3

The recordsize must be the same as the system's VM page size, which is usually 4KB on most systems. For blockchain data, compression is a waste of CPU. Cryptographic data is inherently incompressible.


3

I have 131072 kB and don't get any locking issues here. It may be much more than needed. If you don't know what to do, I suggest trying twice what you have now, and see if that fixes the warning. If not, double again, etc. The more unswappable memory you have, the less leeway your OS has in choosing what to swap out when more memory is needed. If you do this ...


3

It eats up all the RAM because it uses a very large memory mapped database (up to about 20 GB for now), and nothing else seems to need the RAM. If you really want to limit it, you could check ulimit (a bash internal command), which allows you to limit memory consumption: $ ulimit -a [...] virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited eg, to limit ...


3

It looks like it isn't using LMDB yet, because I only have a 3.5 GB blockchain.bin file in the ~/.aeon directory. I brew the software from HEAD, it says aeon v0.9.6.0(). With regard to memory, as far as I can tell, on my macOS system, aeond is using about 9 GB of memory. I have no idea whether this would prevent the daemon from running on a system with only ...


2

I'm running it on a micro instance on AWS with 1 GB of RAM. I did sync with 8 GB, and then commented out the autosave of the blockchain and recompiled and moved to a micro instance and added a bunch swap, but I think it would have worked by just initially commenting out autosave and adding swap as well. I think just comment out this line in cryptonote_core....


2

Compression gets you a little bit with the Monero blockchain: # zfs list -o name,used,lused tank/xmr NAME USED LUSED tank/xmr 155G 166G The actual txns aren't compressible but the database structure has some slack. If you have more CPU than I/O bandwidth then there's a mild benefit. You can benchmark your system to check with time and zpool ...


1

It looks like docker stats is incorrectly reporting memory utilization. Check with htop


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