31

Yes, it is possible to restore your account with just the view and spend keys. monero-wallet-cli has the --generate-from-keys <name> option, which will create a wallet with the given name, and prompt the user for: address, spendkey and viewkey. Example: $ monero-wallet-cli --generate-from-keys myWallet Monero 'Helium Hydra' (v0.11.1.0-release) ...


21

The MyMonero wallets use a different type of mnemonic: 13 words instead of 25 words. The Monero Core GUI (or the CLI) doesn't support restoring a wallet from a 13 word mnemonic seed. Therefore, you'll need to go via the keys. In MyMonero, once logged in, click on the Accounts drop-down menu, and choose Account Details: Next, the "Review Account Details" ...


15

From fluffyponyza here: Due to the nature of the key you can write it as part of something else - eg. write a fake love letter to your wife so that the 24 words on the left hand side are your key or whatever. Then write a bunch of extra love letters. That way, if your deposit box is ever discovered, it'll be disregarded as unimportant love letters". Also,...


15

Importing a wallet from MyMonero into monero-wallet-gui is easy. Follow these Steps: Go to mymonero.com, access your account and navigate to Account Details. it will look like this: Open Monero-wallet-gui and choose the 2nd Option: Now Enter you Account Details from mymonero.com. As Restore height, use the height of the first transaction to your wallet ...


13

Your Monero is safe. There was a load-from-keys bug with v0.8.8.6 Download the current Monero release or build from source and you will be able to recover using your .keys file and password After recovery use the "seed" command in simplewallet and record your mnemonic seed in a safe place for offline cold storage.


11

When you create a new wallet, the software gives you a "mnemonic seed". It's a list of words that can be used to regenerate your wallet file and rescan the block chain to find your transactions. By writing the seed on paper and storing it in a safe place (or by memorizing it if your memory is good), your moneros would not be lost forever in case of a dying ...


9

If the auditor wanted to confirm you had sent funds to a specific address, they'll then need to have the view key of that address also. The only thing the view key of your address can determine which outputs were sent to its corresponding public key. The key images can confirm when a transaction took place, and how much was was moved from your address. It ...


9

Despite the hard fork in March, 2016, setting a minimum mixin and effectively banning dust outputs (except as part of the coinbase, which is further going to change in the September, 2016, hard fork) we provided a "catch" that let users sweep their dust outputs at a mixin of 0. This functionality will be supported indefinitely, because maybe in a few years ...


9

Theres no need to move arround your funds after any fork, even with updates like min mixing and the future RingCT the transactions will allways be compatible with the old ones


9

A Monero wallet can be recovered in a few ways: Recovering from the mnemonic seed that you should have written down when you made the wallet. See more instructions here. Recovering from the view key and the private key. See the usage in the development history here. If you have any of these, it doesn't matter if you lose all your files to a house fire or ...


9

What is stored inside them? Does the wallet store the public and private keys and nothing else? Or does it contain the list of transactions related to the wallet as well and their location on the blockchain? The wallet-name.address.txt stores only the address. It is just for convenience if you want to know your address without having to open the wallet. In ...


8

You can recover the wallet with this simplewallet command: --generate-from-keys


8

Yes, you can always recover your money with the 24 word seed. If your Trezor somehow gets broken, you can get a new one and import the "old" 24 word seed into the new one. Alternatively, if the firmware somehow becomes incompatible, you can convert your Trezor 24 word seed to a 25 word seed compatible with monero-wallet-cli using this guide. Thus, after ...


7

https://xmr.llcoins.net/ has some ways to add security measures to a mnemonic seed. This means even at attacker thinks they found your seed, they need to try and break the additional security. Additionally, a mnemonic seed can be created from any 256 bit number, so any transformations you apply to a private key that don't change the bit length will have a ...


7

You can do various things. Only the words' prefix matters (3 letter prefix for English, 4 letter prefix for all other languages I think), so you can modify the words (ie, if your seed has "marble", you might choose to replace it with "marked", for example). Now, you have what's essentially a stream of bits, and any general way of "hiding" these apply. You ...


7

The encryption used by the keys file is randomized. It uses a key derived from your password, and an IV (initialization vector) which is randomly selected. This is designed to prevent an adversary from determining which parts of the file are the same, and which are different, if you encrypt two files (or two versions of the same file) with the same password. ...


6

You will probably need to rescan the blockchain, this can be done with the command rescan_bc It will take a while, also make sure you have a node running that simplewallet can talk to to do the refresh.


6

After you use --restore-deterministic-wallet and the address loads correctly, type "refresh".


6

The wallet.keys file has the date embedded so the md5sum will change every time you restore with --restore-deterministic-wallet Yes your wallet is deterministic. The new md5sum is no cause for concern because as explained by fluffyponyza: If you got the same address then it restored both your view and spend keys perfectly. Remember that this is not ...


6

You could come up with your own mapping of mnemonic seed words, so that a seed word maps to a custom seed word that you've chosen. The mapping can be the first 25 words of your favorite book, a letter, etc. I'm not sure how valid this is, but even if someone got ahold of your seed, they wouldn't be able to restore your wallet. All this does is essentially ...


6

I tested simplewallet’s --generate-from-json option, using only the spendkey and the viewkey, and as expected, it worked. However, from Luigi's address test page, I learnt that the "Private View Key" is simply derived (Keccak-256 followed by "sc_reduce32") from the "Hexadecimal Seed", which is identical to the "Private Spend Key". Therefore, it is really ...


6

There's a really nice description and address generation tool here: https://xmr.llcoins.net/addresstests.html I believe that site is owned and maintained by core dev person luigi1111. Long quote from luigi's page: Cryptonote Public Addresses differ in several ways compared to Bitcoin. First, Cryptonote uses two keypairs, known as the spend keypair ...


6

You can use any of those methods: backup the mnemonic seed, a 25 word list of words that encode your private keys. This is the simplest way, and you can then restore your wallet with monero-wallet-cli --restore-deterministic-wallet later. After creating a wallet, you can obtain its seed with the seed command in monero-wallet-cli. backup the keys file and ...


5

Remove (or rename) the file "wallet". It's a cache file that will be recreated, and tends to become corrupt. It will be made into an actual database at some point, to avoid these problems. Note that nowadays, deleting this cache isn't as harmless as it used to be, since the cache now contains records that can't be derived from the blockchain (eg, it ...


5

Using Shamir's Secret Sharing Scheme (SSSS) is probably a good alternative, if you want to hide the keys. http://point-at-infinity.org/ssss/ Nearly all Linux distributions have the SSSS package, on Ubuntu, sudo apt-get install ssss You can do an m of n split, and include thresholds in case you are worried about losing 1 of the keys for extra redundancy. ...


5

You need the dictionary, yes. Each word is a representation of a number, and that number is the index of the word in the dictionary. Each triplet of words maps (via their indices in the dictionary) to a 32 bit number. Use 8 of them, and you get your 256 bit seed as a bitstring. The private spend key is the first 128 whole 256 bits (see luigi's comment below)...


5

It is impossible to calculate what the address is that corresponds to a given one-time address (there are actually multiple possibility). It is possible to check if a transaction corresponds to a given address. An auditor would need both your outgoing tx keys, and an address book to figure out where the funds are going.


5

You do the same, except using monero-wallet-cli --generate-from-keys, which will use the spend key in addition to the view key. You will be prompted for the information when you run this. See a guide for using --generate-from-keys here: If I saved my view key and spend key can I recover my wallet if my mnemonic seed is lost?


5

The currently easiest way is to restore your seed using the CLI wallet, spend what you want to spend and immediately send the remainder to a newly created cold storage. See here for some more considerations. To make syncing the wallet faster, you can start the CLI wallet with --restore-deterministic-wallet --restore-height <h> arguments, where <h&...


5

Yes, you can always use a historical wallet that matches the wallet from the time you created your seed. You would then need to determine what the new wallet expects. Because the seeds are depended on by users, it would likely be easy to upgrade, and hopefully a wallet version or two would be backwards compatible. I don't know of any plans to change the ...


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