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12

Any business that accepts Bitcoin can be paid with XMR.to which automatically converts Monero from the buyer into Bitcoin that will promptly be sent to the Bitcoin merchant. Shapeshift.io offers a similar service to xmr.to but with slightly slower payments (they wait for tx confirmations instead of scanning the mem pool like xmr.to) and much lower maximum ...


11

With Monero, unlinkability means that you can display your receiving address publicly yet all payments made to this address cannot be linked to it. This phenomenon is accomplished with the use of one time use stealth addresses for every single transaction. Monero untraceability is provided by ring signatures each transaction uses multiple cryptographic ...


9

The recipient of a transaction does not know the address the money came from. Monero addresses aren't on the blockchain at all. In Monero, every single output is on its own one time address. Only someone with the view secret key of the matching Monero standard address can tell whether a given output corresponds to that address. So the recipient of the ...


9

It is known that Poloniex switched to non zero mixin for a short time for withdrawals. However, they reverted to zero not long after, and I believe this to be due to the increased fees. Unfortunately, exchanges have to deal with people sending very small amounts of every coin, as they mine directly to the exchange address, or if they don't, they send ...


7

With ring CT, the amounts will be obfuscated. Inputs are already obfuscated by using ring signatures. The destination is already obfuscated by using stealth addresses. Only by having the private view key that belongs to the address (and knowing the address), you're able to tell that the output was sent to that address, which is exactly what your wallet does ...


6

If you knew the exact transaction ID, and you got most of the network to implement an emergency hard fork, you could roll back to the block before that transaction and then blacklist that particular transaction ID. You would probably not affect too much by doing this, assuming it was done quickly enough (like within a couple of hours). I doubt that this sort ...


4

Eli5: on the blockchain, all transactions are encrypted in a way that only the holder of the view key can know if he received something. Also, only the holder of the spend key can spend what he received, but also only he (and the recipient) can know if he spent it and where it went. So, for an outsider, he can't blacklist anything because he wouldn't know ...


4

Kind of. All CryptoNote coins use stealth addresses. This helps make it difficult to know what accounts receive money. Monero also uses stealth addresses. However, there are large differences with ring signatures and RingCT. Ring signatures mask the source of funds being used to send a transaction. Monero mandates that at least 5 possible inputs must be ...


3

The wallet cache stores the metadata of outgoing transactions (destination address, secret transaction key, transaction note), which is not stored in the blockchain (see also What data do the wallet files contain? for a list of what else is in the wallet cache file). To have access to these informations, an attacker would need to get the wallet cache file ...


1

I think what you are describing is basically what already exists in Monero (even prior to the RingCT release) You cannot look at the blockchain and know where the output is going.


1

I can't speak on the specifics of any exchange, but we can guess some information from looking at the historical ringsize data. Between September 2015 and March 2016, the Monero wallet used a default ringsize of 3. You can see that only a small proportion of the network used a higher ringsize during this period. That is because Monero's network was most ...


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