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13

Currently the network hashrate is approximately 22.9 MH/s. There are about 30 blocks per hour and 720 blocks per day. On average to find one block per day you would need 1/720 of the current network hashrate or approximately (22.9 MH/s)/(720) = 31.8 kH/s today. The relationship between MH and kH is found here


12

You can solo mine without using a private pool. Hyc modified ccminer and wolf's AMD miner to be able to do solo mining. Unfortunately, no binaries have been made for windows for nvidia version. https://github.com/hyc/ccminer-cryptonight Wolf's has windows binaries https://github.com/wolf9466/wolf-xmr-miner For ccminer you use a URL of the form "daemon+...


11

If you don't want to have the target Aeon wallet open all the time (for security reasons, or you prefer to start mining at system startup non-interactively), you can also start solo CPU mining using the daemon itself. Example syntax (replace the placeholders with actual values obviously): aeond --start-mining <target-aeon-wallet-address> --mining-...


10

Solo mining requires running a full node, pool mining does not. Also, when solo mining, it will usually take much longer to find a block when compared to a pool. Pools do charge a fee, normally 1-2% of the block reward. When pool mining on a Windows PC, I use less than 20 Mb/day download and less than 5 Mb/day upload. Solo mining will be more bandwidth ...


10

There are at least 13 pools but likely more due to private and unkown pools Not yet, but there has been some interest in the idea It does not exist for Monero but it would be a nice little project to create one. The main reason people don't seem to go for it is higher overhead. You have to run a full node, and you have to run what is essentially a ...


7

Sync your daemon. Open the wallet and type: start_mining walletid threads Replace walletid with your public wallet ID, and replace threads with the number of threads you are willing to dedicate to mining. Make sure that you do not put more threads than your processor has, or your mining speed may be impacted.


6

tl;dr Solo mining is a lottery unless you have a few dozen GPUs Explanation Target block time in Monero is 2 minutes, based on that and your share in the network hashrate you can calculate how frequently you will find blocks. Let H be the network hashrate, and h be your own hashrate. Then on average you will find a block every t = 120 / (h / H) = 120 * (...


6

The "24-Core" supported by the motherboard you linked to is per-CPU, (e.g., E7-8890 v4 has 24 cores), so per quad-socket motherboard that would be 96 cores. However, these CPUs cost >$7K each yet you won't benefit much from the n-way architecture when mining. Compare that with less than half that price for a 20-Core, 2-way CPU. Those n-way motherboards are ...


6

Those outgoing connections are also 2-way. All connections are 2-way. Having an incoming means that your node can listen for others that want to connect. With no incoming, your node can still connect to other nodes. So long story short, you can solo mine on a non-public node.


5

There are many ways to help the Monero both directly and indirectly. Run a full node to directly support the network Donate to the Monero Forum Funding System Join a Monero workgroup for mining, support, or any others Participate in many of the Monero forums, such as here on the Stackexchange, on Reddit, Quora, etc Learn as much about Monero as you can so ...


5

Yes, the start_mining <addr> command will send your mined Monero directly to the address you specify. Most people that run their own full node will mine to a local wallet, but mining to a web wallet while not necessarily recommended for privacy reasons is possible. Mining directly to an exchange is only possible if the exchange supports integrated ...


5

For mining Monero (XMR) on GPU in solo mode there is an another way. We can setup Monero Stratum pool (MoneroProxy) from here - https://github.com/sammy007/monero-stratum , and use any miners (such as xmr-stack-cpu, xmr-stack-amd, xmr-stack-nvidia) on every PC at home. As a result - all devices results will be automatically sendes to monerod via RPC.


4

Solo mining is fairly trivial. Note that you have to be fully synced in order to do so. If you are starting from scratch, download the official binaries from here. Subsequently, extract them to a given folder and start monerod. This is the daemon which will now start syncing. To check your blockheight type status into monerod. The blockheight should be equal ...


4

You are mining in a pool when you are running a pool miner. If you mine directly from the daemon or wallet, you are solo mining, not pool mining. Solo mining, which is your case, means you will take a long time to find a block. However, when you do find one, you will get to keep the entire block reward (currently about 8 monero, I believe) instead of it ...


3

It's pretty similar to Bitcoin: First, a block template is created. This is a block skeleton, which looks like a block but is not actually valid due to not having a PoW hash which matches the current difficulty. This block template includes a coinbase tx to the address you specified, and a Merkle tree of the transations it includes. Then, a loop will ...


3

No, definetley not worth the time required to set them up for solo mining, if that's even possible. If it is possible, you'll probably never win a block. As for pool mining, I guess it depends on the hashrate you can get out of one board but for comparison my i7 does about 90H/s, where a single 1070 will do about 500-600H/s using less juice. If there is ...


3

With that budget I'd probably build a rig around the following components: AsRock H110 Pro BTC+ (~140€) 6xMSI GTX 1060 GAMING X6G (~360€ each = 2160€ total) One GTX 1060 overclocked using the following settings will be able to sustain about 540 H/s resulting in 3.2 kH/s with very moderate power consumption: Core Clock +200 MHz Memory Clock +800 MHz Power ...


3

You can easily calculate. Divide the network hashrate with your hashrate and multiply by average block time. The result ought to give you a rough estimate of time between 2 blocks. With 4kH/s that is about every 42 days to find a block (on average, with network hashrate of 120MH/s). The decision is yours :)


2

You'll get a little more with solo mining as you won't have to pay the pool fee, but your income will be much less regular because of the higher variance.


2

Another way to look at it is that a node isn't a factor (as long as the node is up to date). When you mine, you're already requesting that if the work you perform mines a block, the block reward goes to a particular address. The only reason for the node is so your mining software knows it's mining the current block. It sounds like you also have a concern ...


2

You have to be fully synced in order to solo mine. More specifically, you mine on top of the last (consensus) block, which is only possible if you are fully synced or, in other words, in sync with the network. If, however, you're mining on a pool, you don't have to be fully synced (nor have to run monerod technically). Furthermore, you'd need one of the ...


2

There is a solo mining calculator here: https://www.monero.how/monero-mining-calculator This will give you an understanding of the probability of successfully mining a solo block on a daily/weekly/monthly/yearly basis.


2

It's up to personal preference, really. On average, block reward is generally evenly distributed according to hashing power. If you're okay with mining for months at a time without receiving a payout, then perhaps you're better off. If you win a block while solo mining, you don't have to share the block reward with anyone, nor do you have to pay the fee ...


2

If you get this error, then you probably altered the default daemon settings to point to a different daemon. If you did not, then this appears to be a bug. If you did, then you need to undo those changes. Then, starting the GUI will ask you whether to start the daemon, and you can then accept. After some time spent syncing the blockchain, you will then be ...


2

Running a full node with both in and outbound connections on the p2p ports.


2

It's for sure the best thing to join a pool - unless you have a really high hash-power. If you own a data center you can go on and solo mine but in nearly any other case, it's more profitable to use a mining pool. Apart from profitability, for the Monero network it doesn't make a big difference if you solo-mine or not. In general, you of course need "good" ...


2

You can solo-mine with either the command line daemon or wallet (monerod/monero-wallet-cli with the start_mining command) or using the GUI (instructions). The same applies to whichever operating system you use.


1

Yes, you can solo mine using both cards if you use a miner like xmr-stak and point it to a pool that supports solo mining.


1

Set up your own pool on one machine and run a standalone miner on others (xmr-stak-cpu for example). This way you combine the hashing power and get the mined rewards for yourself.


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