4

Since Monero 0.15.0.0, you can use the public_nodes command in monero-wallet-cli. It will query your daemon, as the list is now shared over the P2P network. This can be used in tandem with the bootstrap daemon mode, so you can use RPC services before your node has finished syncing. Similarly, the print_pl daemon command now accepts a publicrpc parameter to ...


3

Safety is a scale relative to your requirements. If the remote node is not your own remote node, you are trusting that remote node to a) not censor you by not relaying transactions or send you blocks from the main chain and b) not to log your IP address. Therefore it's always preferable to use your own node (local or remote). If you're happy with the risks ...


2

A login (username + password), if set on the daemon (via the monerod --rpc-login flag), has to be passed via the --daemon-login flag upon launching monero-wallet-cli. That is, monero-wallet-cli --help states: --daemon-login arg Specify username[:password] for daemon RPC client Thus, in your example, the login ...


2

In both Simple mode and Simple mode (bootstrap) the GUI will automatically connect to a random remote node. This configuration was preset by developers in order to improve user experience for the less technically inclined. This further means that, in both these modes, users cannot set a custom remote node. Whilst this may change in the future, users ...


2

You can use the following cakewallet remote nodes as used in the mobile wallets: East coast: xmr-node-usa-east.cakewallet.com:18081 West coast: xmr-node-usa-west.cakewallet.com:18081 If your using the monero wallet cli command, you use it like this: ./monero-wallet-cli --wallet-file=MY_WALLET_FILE --daemon-address xmr-node-usa-east.cakewallet.com:18081


1

No. There is only a few MB, not 100's of GB on the device for apps and key stores.


1

When using Tails (so Tor for your internet traffic) it is "safer", from an IP tracking perspective, than using clearnet. From an IP tracking perspective there is really no difference in safety between using an SPV wallet such as Electrum or the Monero wallets with a remote node, they both work in a similar fashion and what you are doing by using Tails (so ...


1

No, connecting to multiple remote nodes would increase your risk as you are then having to trust more remote nodes. Remote nodes are not a centralization risk in any case (you can use any remote node that is open and you can always use your own node). Using a remote node, your risk is hoping they are not a bad actor (e.g. they could be logging your usage/...


1

No, a remote node cannot determine your wallet address. However, using a 3rd party remote node, you are trusting the remote node operator to not: log your usage (e.g. IP analysis), trusting that they will not censor your transactions (e.g. broadcast them), trusting they are on the correct chain and trusting they are not doing any kind of transaction ...


1

Let's first start with what's needed to compute which outputs are destined for you: The tx public key (R) Each one-time output destination destination key in the tx (P) Your wallets private view key (a) Therefore, a wallet either needs to offload (trust) sending their private view key to some other node which can perform the scan, or they have to have all ...


1

Neither the CLI or GUI have support for SSL RPC connections. Therefore you have to proxy both server and client over SSL. You can setup a client stunnel proxy to point to the node that is fronted by an SSL proxy and then in the GUI, specify the remote node as localhost and your stunnel client port.


1

Many remote node servers use the port 18089 as explained on Connecting to the remote node from the wallet, so you should try using that port.


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