27

The Monero community encourages you to run a full node so you can get the highest level of privacy and support the network the most. However, we understand that convenience is sometimes more important. For these instances, there are a few options: Use a web wallet. This allows you to use Monero from a web browser without downloading anything, and you can ...


11

you'll want to restrict the RPC, otherwise other people that get access to your node can shut it down. ./monerod --rpc-bind-ip <external.ip.of.node> --restricted-rpc --confirm-external-bind Binding to the external IP will allow you to connect from outside of your home. You might want to also use --rpc-bind-port <portnumber> if you want to ...


9

In Monero 'Wolfram Warptangent' (v0.10.0.0-release), use this flag --user-agent arg It is used to Restrict RPC to clients using this user agent. Make sure to set the user agent to something that cannot be guessed. i.e. a random UUID. That way only RPC clients that set the User-Agent in the HTTP header can access the wallet. However, this requires that ...


7

monero-wallet-cli supports a command line argument "daemon-address" that allows you to specify the host and port to use instead of the defaults. The argument value takes the form host:port. So if you wanted to run monero-wallet-cli using a remote node being hosted by node.moneroworld.com, you would launch simplewallet with the following arguments: monero-...


6

I captured the stream of RPC requests and answers between monero-wallet-cli and monerod (v0.10) with wireshark to see how much data is transferred during a synchronization. It was a synchronization of 658 blocks (blocks 1159032 to 1159659), and the total amount of data exchanged was: 7662 bytes from the wallet to the daemon (get_version, getblocks.bin, ...


6

As @antanst has said, I would also suggest using --rpc-bind-ip and --rpc-bind-port to bind to an external interface but only if your instance is inside an internal/trusted network. I see no reason why your instance should be publicly accessible (if there are reasons, someone please comment). If you must connect across the internet, I would advise to bind ...


5

There is no built-in secure way to use simplewallet (renamed monero-cli-wallet) remotely. However, you could rely on a trusted third party software to secure the transport, like ssh, stunnel, nginx ... BTW, SimpleWallet is very light so there is no (or very few) need to use it remotely.


5

There's a thread in reddit on the subject here: https://www.reddit.com/r/Monero/comments/4jloss/nodemonerohashcom_public_remote_node_for_your/ In short, simply use the switch --daemon-host when calling monero-wallet-cli, then append the ip or hostname. eg. ./monero-wallet-cli --daemon-host node.monerohash.com node.monerohash.com is a free, publicly ...


5

I think initially you will not have a choice of node, but that's more of a question you should ask directly to jaxx. As the wallet is not out yet, we cannot look at it and tell you. Only Jaxx can tell you for sure at this point. Being able to select your node would be a very important option on their wallet for us so I suggest we campaign for that.


5

First thing to note is that simplewallet was renamed to monero-wallet-cli in Wolfram Warptangent. Secondly, it could be that the node is currently offline. There are other remote nodes available here. To quote: node.moneroworld.com are nodes that are from Monero long-term community members, so high trust level 2nodez.moneroworld.com are nodes from anyone (...


5

The wallet password is never transmitted. Tunneling through ssh should be safe, assuming you have a good ssh key.


5

I couldn't find a public remote testnet node, so I created one on a VPS. Here's the address... 159.203.250.205:38081 If you're testing the official CLI wallet, include these options... ./monero-wallet-cli --testnet --daemon-address 159.203.250.205:38081 If you're testing the official GUI wallet, you need to do the following... open monero-core.conf ...


4

This question [After Kovri arrives will some full nodes need to remain on clearnet? ] deals with peer discovery through Kovri. How about peer discovery right now if I wanna run a full node in I2P? Will the current client know to connect to only I2P nodes? Kovri does not yet integrate with Monero. In the future when integrated, there will be three modes: IP ...


4

I just downloaded the Monerujo wallet and trying to figure it out. Is there an instructions page? Yes. Read the README, FAQ. As this app is still in APK form and not released to the app store, use caution and read the disclaimer: You may lose all your Moneroj if you use this App. Be cautious when spending on the mainnet. For maximum privacy, connect to a ...


4

As an alternative to what Moroccan Engineer suggested, if you really want to have the GUI binary running on the remote machine, you could SSH with X forwarding so that you can open graphical applications over SSH, using the -X flag. For more info see here: https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/12755/how-to-forward-x-over-ssh-to-run-graphics-applications-...


4

Just change : ssh XXXXXXX with : ssh -L18081:127.0.0.1:18081 XXXXXXX This means : open a local port 18081, and redirect all messages to 127.0.0.1:18081 in the remote host. This will be exactly like running monerod in your local computer. So just use the default host in monero-wallet-gui, which is 127.0.0.1


4

In addition to @gingeropolous's answer, you can increase your privacy by encrypting the transport. An easy solution is to use ssh tunneling : ssh -L18081:< monerod-local-ip >:< monerod-rpc-bind-port > < external.ip.of.node > For example, if your ssh server is on the same machine as monerod ssh -L18081:127.0.0.1:18081 external.ip.of....


4

Kovri will function as a full i2p router, thus increasing the utility of the i2p network overall, and providing the Monero user a gateway into that network. i2p is The Private Internet - its really its own network, you can sort of think of it like America Online back in the day. If you didn't use AOL in the early 90's, it was not the internet. AOL had its ...


4

Use bitmonerod's --rpc-bind-ip and --rpc-bind-port command line arguments to make it listen to RPC commands in an IP address other than localhost. The RPC port (18081 by default) should be accessible from the internet if you are running the node behind NAT. Use an encrypted tunnel to connect to the daemon, such as OpenVPN or an SSH tunnel. Use the --...


3

This was kind of already answered in this question. Therefore, I'll quote the answer provided by user36303 there. Q: What are the risks in using the same daemon A: They're typically small, and mostly either privacy leaks or denial of service. Obviously, whoever runs the daemon may either withhold new blocks, and try to inject fake blocks. The wallet will ...


3

The goal as outlined by Mr. Fluffy is to use I2P to broadcast transactions and provide Monero services. By default, Monero nodes would still connect as they do now for communicating new blocks and transactions. Wallets would not broadcast transactions through the local node, and instead would broadcast through I2P in an attempt to hide the IP that initiated ...


3

Assuming you're using the CLI tools (since the machine should be up all or most of the time), you should start the daemon process monerod with the --rpc-bind-ip option, and then the IP address of the machine, e.g.: $ monerod --rpc-bind-ip 192.168.0.100 --detach Then any other device on the same 192.168.0.* network will be able to point to your internal ...


3

I do exactly this. Run ./monerod --rpc-bind-ip <your local network ip of this device>. Then on your other machine, launch ./monero-wallet-cli (or the GUI) with ./monero-wallet-cli --daemon-host <the IP of your machine running monerod>. Binding the IP to your LOCAL network IP address will allow only devices on your local network to connect to ...


3

With Monero, the daemon takes care of syncing the blockchain, while the wallet handles private keys. The daemon never has access to private keys [1], only the wallet does. Therefore, if you switch daemons, your wallet address does not change, as long as you continue loading the same wallet. The wallet software will just scan for blocks from a different ...


3

The wallet does the signing. The node never gets access to the the keys. The node's purpose is to keep a local copy of the blockchain in sync with the network at large, and relay transactions made by the wallet. The wallet's purpose is to find incoming transactions and make outgoing transactions using the node. By the time the node sees a transaction, it's ...


3

No. The only leaked data is your IP to the first node as you connect to it. This can however be prevented by the use of VPNs or Kovri once available.


2

When starting your node monerod daemon, use the following start-up flag: --rpc-login username:password Answer supplied by @glv


2

This is a common issue on first configuration. You need to open any firewall on port 18081, and/or forward this port on your router. Otherwise, the connection attempt is rejected. If you open your RPC to the external world, you may want to also use --restricted-rpc, which disables some RPC which could give the client too much information.


2

No, the wallet does not provide the remote node with the view keys. I think you are confusing this with the web wallet MyMonero which requires the view key. The only thing that the remote node will know about you is your IP Address. Edit: The remote node will also know what are your mixins, so best to keep changing remote nodes. Edit: To answer your ...


2

You can use a watch-only wallet to create the TX. When executing transfer command, it'll just save the TX to a file. You can then later open a full wallet and sign & send the TX. It's the same process as described here, only simpler, because you're not using a cold set-up. If you have both wallets in the same folder, you can just have them both opened ...


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