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24

On the daemon side (bitmonerod) P2P Port is the one used to connect with the other nodes on the network (or locally in some cases). RPC port (Remote Procedure Call) is used to let other applications such as simplewallet or the GUI interact with the daemon, for instance to get information about a block. Default ports for the daemon are P2P: 18080 for the ...


9

You can run Monero without an open port but others will not be able to connect to your node in order to help synchronize their nodes. Open port 18080 to allow incoming P2P connections. The RPC port is 18081. print_cn will help you verify your incoming connections are working


8

You should not have anything to do to allow outgoing connections, unless you're in a restrictive environment - in which case the steps to allow this are independent of Monero. If you meant incoming connections, then you need to setup your router to allow port 18080, and forward it to the machine running monerod. If you run "status" in monerod, you will see ...


7

The bitmonerod defaults are: Mainnet: P2P: 18080 RPC:18081 Testnet: P2P: 28080 RPC: 28081 The wallet's RPC port has no default. Wallet and daemon may use 53 for DNS, which is optional. It is recommended to only open the RPC port on your firewall if you need to access RPC from the outside, especially for the wallet.


4

Basically, you have to open the port to outside connections. A tutorial that covers this is on the getmonero.org webpage: https://getmonero.org/knowledge-base/user-guides/vps_run_node If you are running this from your home, you will likely have to configure your router as well to allow such connections. This will vary by router, but usually just involves ...


4

You are confused. The 8+0 does not mean this. The difference between the two types of connections are who initiated it: your daemon, or a peer. Data can flow in both directions, regardless of whether it was initiated locally or by a peer. This also means that mining does not need incoming connections. It can work as well with or without. Not allowing ...


3

The methods to open ports are specific to the router you have. You don't need physical access to the router, just access to the routers web admin interface. So, I suggest you search for your specific router model and instructions, if this is your own router. If you are on a non-configurable network like a public WiFi, instead you need to ask the Internet ...


3

It means that UPnP is disabled on your router. What happens if I disable UPnP on my router? First of all, there is a lot of ambiguity surrounding UPnP. I assume that you mean a device that implements the Internet Gateway Device profile. What happens is that it will not be possible anymore to let applications change firewall settings on the ...


3

While opening ports does put you more at risk than having none open, you are only in danger if an attack can exploit the service that is using that port. An open port is not an all access pass to your PC/network if an attacker happens upon it. They would need to manipulate whatever it is on the other side to gain some type of basic system access. Then they ...


2

When you open up port 18080, you strengthen the network by allowing others to connect to you to download the block chain. Look at your modem/router and get the exact name, model, as well as your internet provider name. Then "google" with that information on how to do port forwarding. Takes a little bit of effort but it's fairly simple, after you do it one ...


2

It's tough to write a step by step guide for port forwarding, because port forwarding is something your router does, and people have different routers. If your router has UPnP, that would be the easiest. Many people will argue that it's safer for UPnP to be off, which is correct; but you can enable it long enough for it to allow the daemon to punch a ...


2

MoneroWorld is not dead. Unlikely a ports issue, it's all outbound. You are connecting to it then trying to start_mining and herein lies your issue - you are trying to mine on a remote public node. Please see this Q&A.


2

No, you do not. You might possibly need open ports if you are "running a node" (i.e., you try to run 'monerod'), and try to mine through that node. If all you want to do is mining, though, I suggest you use a mining pool (see here for a list). In this case you definitely do not need any open incoming ports, since all you need is for your miner to connect ...


2

Theoretically if no node accepted incoming connections then the network would be limited to transactions originating from any of the aforementioned nodes. The network would survive as miners would still process those transactions. The biggest effect would come in the loss of third party services that require a remote node to operate (for example some light ...


2

You may be confused about outgoing and incoming connections. Outgoing connections refer to your node reaching out to the network to initiate connections with other nodes. Incoming connections refer to other nodes initiating a connection with your node. If you want to not only "leach" off the network, but also provide your blockchain copy to other nodes, ...


2

As I answered to your previous question, you do not need to forward any ports for the p2p interface. This is the interface nodes use to send each other data, such as blocks. transactions and peerlists. Other nodes can sync with you fine without router port forwarding because when you initiate an outbound connection to a peer, it is kept open, thus data can ...


2

If uPNP won't cooperate, you can create a port forwarding rule (in Firewall > NAT > Port Forward) for the WAN interface that directs a destination of port 18080 to port 18080 of the internal IP of your node. This will have the effect of also creating a firewall rule on the WAN interface that allows the traffic arriving at port 18080 to pass through to the ...


1

Yes. It is set for you based on flags passed in when launching the daemon. Without the --testnet or --stagenet flags, it defaults to mainnet. Unique port numbers are used to prevent clashing with other services. A fork using the default monero ports would be very bad practice.


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