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11

No, but it's on the list of things we have to do. At this juncture it would be wasted on Monero, but once / if we switch the wire protocol to something standardised like ZMTP then it will be nearly trivial to do.


10

8 is the number of peers that you are connected to. 0 is the number of peers that are connected to you. if you want to allow others to connect to you, you need to open port 18080 on your firewall/router.


9

Miners will lose what they would have gained if the pool had been on the right fork: any block mined on the wrong fork will eventually get reorganized away. If the pool's on the wrong fork, any money from the wrong chain it sends miners will be just that: on the wrong chain. It will therefore only appear in wallets running the wrong chain. This will ...


9

The security of a PoW network is basically the amount of money needed to attack it. Bitcoin has had a lot of money poured into miners, and Monero nowhere as much. As an idea of how much money would be needed to attack Monero via a 51% attack, see this post: How much money would be required to cloud mine 51% of the network hash rate?. The network hash rate ...


9

It's a two way connection, the IN refers to connections initiated by the peer, and OUT refers to connections initiated by your node, but communication is duplex. In that status command, the X+Y part is X OUT connections and Y in connections. You're connected to all of these nodes, the only difference is which side initiated the connection.


8

It would not bring the monero network down. At most, it would prevent new nodes from adding to the network. The seed nodes are "well known" nodes which act as the first port of call for newly setup nodes. Once a node is already in the network, it does not need the seed nodes. If a node stops and is then restarted after a delay, the list of known peers is ...


8

You should not have anything to do to allow outgoing connections, unless you're in a restrictive environment - in which case the steps to allow this are independent of Monero. If you meant incoming connections, then you need to setup your router to allow port 18080, and forward it to the machine running monerod. If you run "status" in monerod, you will see ...


7

A node will connect to up to 8 peers by default (P2P_DEFAULT_CONNECTIONS_COUNT in src/cryptonote_config.h). I think there is no set limit of incoming connections, though if a lot of peers try to connect, you might end up hitting your open files quota. The more peers you are connected to, the more traffic you will have to propagate blocks and transactions. ...


7

You can change them, either when starting monerod: --limit-rate-up arg (=-1) set limit-rate-up [kB/s] --limit-rate-down arg (=-1) set limit-rate-down [kB/s] --limit-rate arg (=-1) set limit-rate [kB/s] Or at runtime: limit limit <kB/s> - Set download and upload limit limit_down ...


6

The coinbase transactions are not anonymised (as they don't need to be), so no, situations like what you describe won't happen. The coinbase transactions will ensure the integrity of the coin supply can be verified.


5

Not really. Rapid growth in hashrate would only be slightly useful short term until the difficulty retargets which happens rather fast. This is only because you'd reduce the time between the blocks slightly so you may be able to squeeze a little more over some time period. It really relies on blocksize median increasing, which is happening slowly - right ...


5

You can set the number of your daemon outgoing peers (ie, peers it connects to) with the command line parameter --out-peers. The default is 8. For having incoming peers, you need to open up your firewall for your daemon's p2p port. This port is typically 18080 but can be customized with the --p2p-bind-port. I think you cannot limit the number of incoming ...


5

It means that the network is used by more powerful miners. Difficulty adjusts to the network hashrate (after every block, unlike Bitcoin which adjusts difficulty only every 2016 blocks, around two weeks for 1 block / 10 minutes), meaning it will be more difficult to mine a block the more miners will join the network (if the overall hashrate goes up). I ...


5

There are many ways to help the Monero both directly and indirectly. Run a full node to directly support the network Donate to the Monero Forum Funding System Join a Monero workgroup for mining, support, or any others Participate in many of the Monero forums, such as here on the Stackexchange, on Reddit, Quora, etc Learn as much about Monero as you can so ...


4

Something like this had already happened, with no impact to the network performance. It was a prelude to the actual attack, the infamous block 202612 attack. Quoting fluffypony in the bitcointalk thread (emphasis mine): The fork was the intention and the net-effect. They would have had to mine two of those blocks in parallel and dump them both on the ...


4

Pretty sure that's how it works. You can also use the command "status" and you'll see at the end of the line a number like "8+1" this shows the number of nodes you are connected to, and after the + shows the number of nodes you are serving.


4

The isolated North American nodes would continue communicating, transacting, and mining among themselves. The world set of nodes would do the same. At this point you have two possible chains. If communication is ever re-established the fork would resolve itself with the longest chain winning. Depending on the time-span this could be catastrophic ...


4

You are confused. The 8+0 does not mean this. The difference between the two types of connections are who initiated it: your daemon, or a peer. Data can flow in both directions, regardless of whether it was initiated locally or by a peer. This also means that mining does not need incoming connections. It can work as well with or without. Not allowing ...


4

Your understanding is correct: outgoing connections are initiated by you, incoming connections are initiated by the peer. You can certainly have a peer syncing from you via an outgoing connection though. The 800 connections is just a bug in the accounting. They're not all actual connections. You can see that using netstat or similar tool. When a node is ...


4

No. In any case, internet connection bandwidth and access is far more impactful to the network. Using a spinning disk, it's just you who will feel the pain during your initial full sync. Once you have got the blockchain on your spinning disk however, there is really no issue keeping it synced up, so long as you keep it running.


3

I don't think the numbers encode the phrase, but it must be a reference to Futurama. In season 2 episode 7, Bender has a nightmare of random 1s and 0s appearing, and he thinks he even saw a 2! Whether our network identifier somehow relates with numbers appearing in that episode, I have no idea.


3

It means that UPnP is disabled on your router. What happens if I disable UPnP on my router? First of all, there is a lot of ambiguity surrounding UPnP. I assume that you mean a device that implements the Internet Gateway Device profile. What happens is that it will not be possible anymore to let applications change firewall settings on the ...


3

I'm going to attempt to answer the two parts of this question, but with the caveat that the second half of my answer is certainly at least in part opinion based. Could IPFS be used with Monero's blockchain? Yes. In theory, any blockchain could be used to store non-transaction-related information, and tokens could even be involved in such a storage scheme ...


3

You can set the number of your daemon outgoing peers (ie, peers it connects to) with the command line parameter --out-peers. The default is 8. For having incoming peers, you need to open up your firewall for your daemon's p2p port (typically 18080). I think you cannot limit the number of incoming connections. For limiting the traffic for all of these ...


3

The network hash rate never reached 70 MH/s (I don't think it even reached 60 MH/s, though it came close), so this points to a bug in the site you're looking at. It seems likely that this is related to the switch in block target from 60 seconds to 120 seconds a while back. Some sites never noticed, and started reporting wrong difficulty. Maybe this site ...


3

This usually works, but I broke something when moving the seeder to a new set of servers. It should be working again soon!


2

You may be confused about outgoing and incoming connections. Outgoing connections refer to your node reaching out to the network to initiate connections with other nodes. Incoming connections refer to other nodes initiating a connection with your node. If you want to not only "leach" off the network, but also provide your blockchain copy to other nodes, ...


2

Under the Settings tab you can click the Show Status box. If you want to leave this open, it will intermittently post the daemon status(I am not sure how often it updates though), or if you prefer, you can type a few commands to activate info manually(the command box is to the right of the Close box; this is your CLI interface for the GUI). Commands to ...


2

Generally, 1 Monerod instance per internet IP address, physical location, or operator is adequate to enhance network decentralization.


2

No, the wallet does not provide the remote node with the view keys. I think you are confusing this with the web wallet MyMonero which requires the view key. The only thing that the remote node will know about you is your IP Address. Edit: The remote node will also know what are your mixins, so best to keep changing remote nodes. Edit: To answer your ...


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