17

First, there is no stealing possible, so your funds are safe ASSUMING THE MONEROV (OR OTHER KEY REUSING FORK) SOFTWARE IS NOT A TROJAN. If it is not, then the key reuse only affects one of the privacy layers Monero offers, and does not allow either double spending nor stealing. Of course, since monerov is currently closed source, it may be that the binaries ...


15

MoneroV is a chain split off Monero. It will inherit Monero's history going forward. MoneroV is widely regarded as an attack on the Monero network. Any initial transactions made on MoneroV will be directly linked to their Monero counterpart. For instance, suppose I have money in Monero address A at the time of the chain split. I then spend my MoneroV and ...


15

No reason. Some did just that (probably not intentionally, though). You're free to mine on that chain, I think it's still there. You could make an exchange and sell those monero if you wished (assuming you find buyers). The reason ETC kept going strong is that the ETH fork chose to reach back and blacklist some transactions or outputs (I don't know the ...


11

Yes, it will. Every time a substantial change is made in one fork, the other forks will find it more difficult to port anything they might want where it conflicts. I'd say the main change from the point of view of mergeability between forks was the LMDB change, which rewrote a large part of the blockchain handling. Cryptonote has also changed a lot since ...


10

Go here and screw around with the genesis tx and nonce. You probably also want to change other stuff (network id) to avoid contacting live Monero nodes. I've helpfully decoded the genesis tx so you know/can guess what to change: version 01 unlock time (varint, height, 60 here) 3c vin length (value in) 01 vin #1 (of 1) type (gen, 0xff) ff height for gen ...


9

monero-blockchain-blackball was created to allow a line of defense against other people using Monero with low regard for privacy. In the simplest sense, this tool allows you to ignore others' outputs (containers of money) that are known to be spent in a certain transaction. If you would include these in your transaction as decoys, these decoys would provide ...


9

MoneroV despite whatever intentions it may claim is an actual attack on MoneroV's own privacy as well as Monero's and even in MoneroV's claims of basic differences highlights several red flags that make MoneroV indistinguishable from a scam. I say it is a definite attack and not subjective because it does undermine RingCT (explained below) even if that's not ...


7

This is information in supplement to user36303's comment. I've created a high-level guide below on how to handle chain splits. Many of the actions can be taken with the steps listed in the other comment. Keep in mind that even if you do make transactions without claiming a chain split, you should commit to it. If you have even the slightest desire to claim ...


6

The genesis block is not predicted. The genesis block is decided upon in advance, and then hard coded as the first block that must appear in the blockchain. You can see it hard coded in the codebase here: std::string const GENESIS_TX = "...


6

When Monero forked to v7, it changed its proof of work algorithm. While it previously used Cryptonight, it now uses a slight variant (technically, variant 1) of Cryptonight, which should be typically slightly slower to compute. After the fork, miners would were not able to update their hash algorithm were left unable to mine Monero. While patches were made ...


6

Centralization is a continuum. Actions and circumstances move a particular system along that continuum. There are several points which are topical here: Monero development is made by a smallish number of people (more centralized) Anybody with skills is free to join Monero development (less centralized) A single party being able to dictate what gets mined ...


4

I had the same problem. I had to solve it by writing custom function. It generates new account, save account keys to file, and sends block 0 reward money to it in genesis transaction. It also generates source code line to be changed in the cryptonote config file. Note: Monero CLI wallet would not see block reward sent in this transaction because it does ...


4

The genesis block is automatically created for you from the genesis transaction and the genesis nonce that is hard coded here: https://github.com/monero-project/monero/blob/3ad4ecd4ff52f011ee94e0e80754b965b82f072b/src/cryptonote_config.h#L162 If you don't care about receiving the funds generated in the genesis transaction, then you can leave it unaltered ...


3

I fixed it changing this line from 1 to 0. your_coin/CMakeLists.txt:102 # set this to 0 if per-block checkpoint needs to be disabled set(PER_BLOCK_CHECKPOINT 0) It means that before I was running my coin with checkpoints when it does not should have because is a new blockchain.


3

Disclaimer: I am the creator of this new wallet When you use MyMonero, your private view is sent to the server (with your public address), but not the private spend keys. It means the server is able so see your balance(EDIT: the server is able to see the incomming amounts, not the outgoing amounts. It means the balance will be off), and the server is ...


3

There is no support for MoneroV in Freewallet. Unless they support the fork, you will not be able to claim MoneroV. As a reminder, Freewallet controls your private keys. If you used a different application such as Monerujo, Cake Wallet, or X Wallet, you could restore your Monero (including possibly claiming coins) on another device.


3

Yes, it is normal. Block creation is random. Sometimes it'll take more time than your target, and sometimes less. Think of it as flipping a coin. You can expect tails in... hmm... a bit more than 1.5 tries I think. But if you try it, sometimes you'll get tails in just one try, and sometimes it'll take 20 tries. But the average will converge to about the ...


3

0.13.0.4 can not understand the current consensus rules, so it's essentially playing in its own abandoned playpen. You never found any Monero. It's a bit similar to participating in a bike race, taking a wrong turn and somehow ending up on last week's bike race's circuit and going over that finish line that's still chalked on the ground. You did not win that ...


2

As far as I know, they're all the same. There's no actual maintained fork, just the ASICs which didn't switch to another coin continuing mining on their own chain. Three (four I think ?) different people tried to "put a flag" on that in case it amounted to anything, but as far as I know, none of the Monero devs have any interest in maintaining an old version ...


2

Because you can mine MoneroV with it and that is considered a malware by antivirus software. Monero has the same problem (MoneroV wallet is a clone of the Monero wallet). Other mining software have the same issue. For example XMRig shows up also as a malware.


2

I'm guessing this refers to the "mass social engineering" attack where people are "paid" to use their Monero keys against the network. If you can get enough people to "de-anonymize" their transactions, the remaining anonymity pool decreases. It works like this: someone forks monero, and sets their starting chain to be a copy of the existing monero chain ...


2

Monero has updated its consensus rules a couple months ago. What some call "Monero original" is just an old Monero version on which some people continued to mine. You need to update your software so it can parse the new blocks/transactions or it will stay on the old chain. Until you do, it will not be able to understand those "new version" blocks, and warn ...


2

Im going to assume you've setup a mining pool for your "custom coin", just set the correct algo perimeters on xmrig and point it to your mining pool. Nothing needs to be modified in XMRig


2

Monero is based on Cryptonote, which has a forking guide. This guide will show you the places in Monero's codebase that you'll want to examine and modify: https://github.com/cryptonotefoundation/cryptonote#cryptonote-forking-how-to The main things you'll want to do are: Name the fork Decide on the total money supply, emission curve and time between blocks ...


2

If you create a coin, people will mine it. Once they mine it, they will get coins as a reward. You then have to negotiate with exchanges to list your coin or in a best case scenario they will list the coin for free. After they list the coin, people can buy / sell them.


2

If the tx is in the mempool, a tx hash must exist. If the wallet RPC is not returning to you the tx hash in the result of the transfer call, your fork codebase has issues. Blocks not being mined could be related, but could equally be an issue with your miners or pool implementation (which obviously also need to be updated inline with your fork code changes).


2

You need to run a private testnet. Instructions can be found here: https://github.com/moneroexamples/private-testnet Without it being private, your mined blocks wont make it onto the real testnet chain because you are mining with a lowered difficulty due to you using the --fixed-difficulty 10 option, and they wont get broadcast due to you using the --...


1

Yes. It is set for you based on flags passed in when launching the daemon. Without the --testnet or --stagenet flags, it defaults to mainnet. Unique port numbers are used to prevent clashing with other services. A fork using the default monero ports would be very bad practice.


1

The only reason you don't have to worry about "--restricted-rpc" in testing is if the test servers are firewalled off from the world so that no external machines can connect. In production, you need to worry about general operational security and availability/uptime issues. Your nodes should be running on servers that are properly firewalled so that only ...


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