31

Yes, it is possible to restore your account with just the view and spend keys. monero-wallet-cli has the --generate-from-keys <name> option, which will create a wallet with the given name, and prompt the user for: address, spendkey and viewkey. Example: $ monero-wallet-cli --generate-from-keys myWallet Monero 'Helium Hydra' (v0.11.1.0-release) ...


21

The MyMonero wallets use a different type of mnemonic: 13 words instead of 25 words. The Monero Core GUI (or the CLI) doesn't support restoring a wallet from a 13 word mnemonic seed. Therefore, you'll need to go via the keys. In MyMonero, once logged in, click on the Accounts drop-down menu, and choose Account Details: Next, the "Review Account Details" ...


15

Thanks to deterministic key derivation, the private spend key is an alternate representation of the mnemonic seed. Both the mnemonic seed and private spend key can be used to derive all other keys The private spend key is used to sign Monero transactions. Simplewallet mnemonics seed are comprised of 25 words with the last word being used as a checksum. ...


15

From fluffyponyza here: Due to the nature of the key you can write it as part of something else - eg. write a fake love letter to your wife so that the 24 words on the left hand side are your key or whatever. Then write a bunch of extra love letters. That way, if your deposit box is ever discovered, it'll be disregarded as unimportant love letters". Also,...


13

General The purpose of a checksum is exactly what the word means - to "check" something, and the simplest form of it is to check the sum. In general, checksum is a way to let you know if you got the right sequence of numbers. Let's say you have to write down 4 numbers, and use an extra 5th digit as a checksum where the 5th number is calculated by summing ...


12

The most straightforward way is probably to generate 256 bits of entropy (a fair 20 sided dice will give you a bit more than 4 bits per roll, so make it 64 rolls), and record all these throws in the custom entropy box at https://moneroaddress.org, then generate a new wallet from this. You'll have downloaded this page first (it can run standalone from your ...


11

There is no support for SSS in simplewallet. This would require some amount of new modexp code to be added (unless a variant of it can be made using EC cryptography, but I'm not aware of any). So the best you can do is use a standalone SSS tool such as ssss (see http://point-at-infinity.org/ssss/). It may already be in your distribution's packages. Example,...


11

You could also scrypt your paper wallet. Then use base64 to get the encrypted data in a printable format. This way somebody stealing it will still need a password to get the keys or mnemonic seed and scrypt will make sure that brute force attacks are infeasible even for weak passwords. Encode: scrypt enc -t120 data.txt | base64 > data.enc.txt Decode: ...


11

When you create a new wallet, the software gives you a "mnemonic seed". It's a list of words that can be used to regenerate your wallet file and rescan the block chain to find your transactions. By writing the seed on paper and storing it in a safe place (or by memorizing it if your memory is good), your moneros would not be lost forever in case of a dying ...


11

To answer if it will be converted is really opinion-based as I'm not aware of anybody working on it. To answer if there's an actual need is a harder one, but let's try. Trezor support is on the way, despite Monero being a deviant child and daring to go its own way. If there's a real need for a BIP-39 variant, it will be done by whomever finds it important ...


10

The number of ways to arrange n distinct objects is simply n! (n factorial), so for 13 unique words (I don't believe they're allowed to have repeats repeats are allowed, but the probability of getting a repeat for 12 words selected randomly from 1500 is pretty low, about 5%), you could arrange them in 6227020800 different ways, however the final word is a ...


10

Right now there are two primary ways to do so: Go to the folder containing monero-wallet-cli and run "./monero-wallet-cli --restore-deterministic-wallet", entering your mnemonic seed when prompted. NOTE that this will simply restore your wallet keys. You will still need to scan a blockchain (either your local blockchain or a remote blockchain) to see your ...


10

TL;DR first is completely random seed, 2nd is the "normalized" seed, and they're both valid and resolve to the same wallet. As long as you know the method to go from mnemonic to the actual private key, you're safe to keep it as it is. The first is a just some random 256 bits, probably generated by other means and the second is the "normalized" seed, meaning ...


9

I personally would not trust a run of the mill D20 as the vast majority simply aren't made to roll in a genuinely random manner http://www.1000d4.com/2013/02/14/how-true-are-your-d20s/ http://www.dakkadakka.com/wiki/en/That%27s_How_I_Roll_-_A_Scientific_Analysis_of_Dice If you are paranoid, then nothing less than truly random dice like those used in ...


9

When recovering by mnemonic seed, you must actually type your mnemonic seed (or at least the first 3 letters of each word, 4 in some languages). You are able to recover a wallet with hex data but in a different manner: With simplewallet(monero-wallet-cli) the private key is the hexadecimal representation of the 25 word mnemonic seed. Recovery options from ...


9

Yes, it's less secure because it's 128bits of entropy in the 13-word seed vs 256bits of entropy in the 25-word seed. However, it's considered safe enough as it would again take an impossible* amount of time to generate a collision. The process for mymonero is: mnemonic -> seed -> private spend & private view keys The process for simplewallet is: ...


9

A Monero wallet can be recovered in a few ways: Recovering from the mnemonic seed that you should have written down when you made the wallet. See more instructions here. Recovering from the view key and the private key. See the usage in the development history here. If you have any of these, it doesn't matter if you lose all your files to a house fire or ...


9

I was wondering if you can create a wallet by selecting these 25 words yourself and going from there. Yes. But you actually select 24 words and compute the last one (25th is the checksum, and it will always be one of the 24 words of your seed mnemonic). Your wallet is really defined by those first 24 words, and the last one is an extra which lets you check ...


8

You can recover the wallet with this simplewallet command: --generate-from-keys


7

At the beginning, when we designed the mnemonic seed mechanism, the spec was to have a seed derived from the mnemonic, hash it to produce the spend key, and hash it again to produce the view key. Somewhere in the implementation this spec got lost, and instead the seed derived from the mnemonic was the spend key, and the viewkey was hashed from that. When ...


7

You can restore a wallet/account with the private keys as hexadecimal data, rather than their mnemonic form, using either the --generate-from-keys or --generate-from-json options to simplewallet. See the answer to If I saved my view key and spend key can I recover my wallet if my mnemonic seed is lost? for the full instructions.


7

I will answer your second question first: Yes, a longer word list would lead to increased entropy and a shorter list would lead to decreased entropy. Monero avoids this problem by relying on an Electrum word list that is exactly 1626 words for each language. Because of this, the entropy of mnemonic seeds created with simplewallet for each language below will ...


7

The encryption used by the keys file is randomized. It uses a key derived from your password, and an IV (initialization vector) which is randomly selected. This is designed to prevent an adversary from determining which parts of the file are the same, and which are different, if you encrypt two files (or two versions of the same file) with the same password. ...


7

You can do various things. Only the words' prefix matters (3 letter prefix for English, 4 letter prefix for all other languages I think), so you can modify the words (ie, if your seed has "marble", you might choose to replace it with "marked", for example). Now, you have what's essentially a stream of bits, and any general way of "hiding" these apply. You ...


7

https://xmr.llcoins.net/ has some ways to add security measures to a mnemonic seed. This means even at attacker thinks they found your seed, they need to try and break the additional security. Additionally, a mnemonic seed can be created from any 256 bit number, so any transformations you apply to a private key that don't change the bit length will have a ...


7

Yes, it's because the last word is a checksum word which will always be picked from one of the words in the mnemonic. See here for more details. In fact, one word could occur even more than 2 times. For example, aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces aces, is a perfectly ...


7

The best option I found is: http://cryptosteel.com I bought few of them. This is by far the best option in my opinion.


6

I tested simplewallet’s --generate-from-json option, using only the spendkey and the viewkey, and as expected, it worked. However, from Luigi's address test page, I learnt that the "Private View Key" is simply derived (Keccak-256 followed by "sc_reduce32") from the "Hexadecimal Seed", which is identical to the "Private Spend Key". Therefore, it is really ...


6

The seed is a way to encode a bitstring using words that will hopefully be easier to remember. In this case, the seed is composed of a number of words picked from a 1626 entries list. Each triplet of words can then represent a value between 0 and 4298942375, which is a bit above 2^32. So every 32 bit part of the seed can map to a word triplet, and back to ...


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