8

Most of the space in a block is transactions. Most of the space in transactions is signatures (especially with RingCT). The wallet doesn't actually verify signatures, the daemon does it (you're running your own daemon, right ?) Signatures are an obvious candidate for eliding when transmitting new data from the daemon to the wallet. Pretty much all of the ...


7

You need to pass every output public key, along with every transaction public key. If we assume RingCT (going forward), this is 3 * 32 bytes per transaction (1 transaction public key + 2 output public keys -- currently much more than that due to denominations). This is the bare minimum with the current implementation. You will leak which transactions you're ...


7

monero-wallet-cli supports a command line argument "daemon-address" that allows you to specify the host and port to use instead of the defaults. The argument value takes the form host:port. So if you wanted to run monero-wallet-cli using a remote node being hosted by node.moneroworld.com, you would launch simplewallet with the following arguments: monero-...


6

I captured the stream of RPC requests and answers between monero-wallet-cli and monerod (v0.10) with wireshark to see how much data is transferred during a synchronization. It was a synchronization of 658 blocks (blocks 1159032 to 1159659), and the total amount of data exchanged was: 7662 bytes from the wallet to the daemon (get_version, getblocks.bin, ...


6

Yep! That can totally work. We'll call your headless node the Monerodo for simplicities sake (Monerodo = Monero Node). On the Monerodo you want to launch monero with the following flag: monerod --rpc-bind-ip IP.OF.YOUR.MONERODO This tells your daemon to listen to RPC calls on the IP address provided. Then on your other computers, you just run the wallet ...


5

There's a thread in reddit on the subject here: https://www.reddit.com/r/Monero/comments/4jloss/nodemonerohashcom_public_remote_node_for_your/ In short, simply use the switch --daemon-host when calling monero-wallet-cli, then append the ip or hostname. eg. ./monero-wallet-cli --daemon-host node.monerohash.com node.monerohash.com is a free, publicly ...


5

This addresses part of your question: The lightwallet by jwinterm is probably most similar thing to an SPV wallet so far https://getmonero.org/getting-started/choose shen-noether is working on a mobile wallet that will connect to a remote node https://hellomonero.com/tags/shen-noether Jaxx and Exodus wallets are also in development Mnemonic ...


5

First thing to note is that simplewallet was renamed to monero-wallet-cli in Wolfram Warptangent. Secondly, it could be that the node is currently offline. There are other remote nodes available here. To quote: node.moneroworld.com are nodes that are from Monero long-term community members, so high trust level 2nodez.moneroworld.com are nodes from anyone (...


4

There are no pre-compiled GUI binaries released yet. When beta is released you will be able to download binaries but for now you need to build them yourself.


4

There is no tooling to do this at this time.


4

In addition to answers provided, here's an idea for a fuzzy-wallet: A wallet which would sacrifice accurracy of the actual balance to be able to be lighter. The idea is to have some kind of outside signaling for when you received the funds. In many cases, you expect payments, or someone lets you know that he sent you the funds. This could be used as an ...


4

Basically, you have to open the port to outside connections. A tutorial that covers this is on the getmonero.org webpage: https://getmonero.org/knowledge-base/user-guides/vps_run_node If you are running this from your home, you will likely have to configure your router as well to allow such connections. This will vary by router, but usually just involves ...


4

Monero has a completely different code-base than Bitcoin. It was not inherited from Bitcoin, and it was written from scratch (Bytecoin was the first CryptoNote cryptocurrency, and Monero inherited that codebase, not Bitcoin's - it's a fork of Bytecoin) Thing is, all Bitcoin clones can simply copy what's already been done and maybe do some small tweaks. On ...


3

In Monero there's two "syncs". First, the blockchain sync, which is basically downloading the blockchain from other nodes / peers. Second, the wallet sync, which is the wallet "refreshing" / scanning blocks looking for transactions belonging to your address / wallet. Since you're using a remote node, you're skipping the first step. Thus, the status indicator ...


3

The MyMonero desktop app is built with Electron. To build it you need to install NodeJS and NPM. After installing Node, download the source code from GitHub, open command prompt and go to the directory containing the source code, run npm install to grab the dependencies and then npm start to launch the program.


3

As far as I can tell from the code, the option 1 seems to be the case. Most of the core functions of the wallet are implemented in src/wallet/wallet2.cpp. In pull_blocks which is called from within refresh, the wallet fetches individual blocks in its entirety. Subsequent to that function is process_blocks which then calls process_new_blockchain_entry which ...


3

This was kind of already answered in this question. Therefore, I'll quote the answer provided by user36303 there. Q: What are the risks in using the same daemon A: They're typically small, and mostly either privacy leaks or denial of service. Obviously, whoever runs the daemon may either withhold new blocks, and try to inject fake blocks. The wallet will ...


3

I assume you mean "light" to mean that the wallet does not keep a copy of the blockchain. Well, if you have a node to point the wallet at, whether it be a trusted external node or whether it be your little Raspberry Pi for example, then you can configure monero-wallet-cli to act as a light client. Actually, very little configuration is needed at all. See ...


2

I was trying to do the same thing, but so far didn't realize what I was doing wrong. There reason it took me so long to figure it out was that I didn't find the errors here on Stack Exchange, at least not in the context of using a LAN node. Therefore, I'll post them in my answer, to hopefully help other people searching for them. My LAN set-up: Server, ...


2

I'm not qualified to answer this but I'll provide this in answer in the hopes that someone more qualified will step in. There is no reason why you shouldn't connect to a remote node, but any node you connect to (local or remote) should be your own, because you can trust your own nodes. In any case, if the node you are going to connect to is remote, you ...


2

After some experimenting, I have news on this question. A trusted Monero contributor provided me with an unofficial pre-built binary (actually, it was a directory of files, plus an executable to run the GUI), since I wanted to help test the GUI. I ran into some difficulties, but got it working with community help. The short answer is no, the GUI does not ...


2

This is a bug: the restore height should have been taken into account. If you don't specify a restore height, it actually works (you get asked for one, which is used). This will be fixed.


2

Even though MyMonero generates a 13 word mnemonic seed by default, it will accept a 25 word mnemonic seed (generated by either the CLI or the GUI) as well. There are basically two options: You import the 25 word mnemonic seed generated by the CLI/GUI before any transactions are sent to the corresponding address. In this case you won't have to pay an import ...


2

Same like mymonero: How does mymonero web wallet work? Instead of your wallet getting blockchain data and scanning it yourself, you give the service your viewkey and address and it does the scanning for you. It has privacy drawbacks. The service can see your incoming transfers and amounts. It can not see the destination. However, it could make good guesses ...


2

(A speculative answer): Yes, it seems that most exchanges have 0.05 XMR withdrawal fee. Monero transaction fees are quite high but not that high. Perhaps the exchanges try to offset the cost of Monero integration. Remember that XMR has no common code with BTC and its' clones, so it must have been more costly to integrate than another BTC fork/spinoff. ...


2

Alright, solved generating monero wallets problem like that (using Meteor.js): Downloaded this AWESOME repo: https://github.com/mymonero/mymonero-core-js Unpacked this repo to the node_modules folder. On client startup entered this code: const walletUtils = require('mymonero-core-js/monero_utils/monero_wallet_utils') const wallet = walletUtils....


2

The stagenet address network bytes are defined in decimal in the file https://github.com/monero-project/monero/blob/3ad4ecd4ff52f011ee94e0e80754b965b82f072b/src/cryptonote_config.h uint64_t const CRYPTONOTE_PUBLIC_ADDRESS_BASE58_PREFIX = 24; uint64_t const CRYPTONOTE_PUBLIC_INTEGRATED_ADDRESS_BASE58_PREFIX = 25; uint64_t const ...


1

You can set up a Monero daemon and then connect to it with this node.js client You should also check out rx-monero-wallet Both of these are reasonably documented


1

The article Javascript Cryptography Considered Harmful goes through this quite well. Secure delivery of Javascript to browsers is a chicken-egg problem. Newer browsers that support Subresource Integrity allow a website to specify a file hash for an external resource (a stylesheet or some Javascript). This is nice but there is nothing stopping an attacker ...


1

If you run a full node and use the wallet that comes with it, you have complete privacy. The odds of being robbed go down to practically zero because no one can see what your doing. When you use any type of a wallet that connects to a remote node, your privacy is gone. The host of the remote node can see what you are doing. If you only have a few ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible