22

It was chosen arbitrarily by thankful_for_today, with no research or thinking of any kind. But we're stuck with it, and since it's part of the social contract it isn't going to change:)


21

The emission curve is the same as Bytecoin's except stretched out by a factor of 2. There was an extended debate about slowing the emission curve at some point that seems to have concluded around the end of 2014: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=753252.msg9842542#msg9842542 It's hard to google up since it's for the most part buried in bitcointalk ...


11

Is it possible to change the total supply afterwards, by a Hard Fork for example? That would be possible, but it would break the social contract. I am quite certain almost all community members and miners would be opposed to it. Does is prevent the equal distribution of Moneros? Not necessarily. Given that Monero has a tail emission of <1% per year (...


9

It's steeper than bitcoin's because thankful-for-today made it that way. Indeed, if you dig into the bitcointalk forum history, you can find that not many early monero community members were supporting this curve and there was actually discussions about changing the curve. While this is outside the scope of this particular question, no one actually knows ...


8

There's no definitive answer to this (I've asked the devs in the past and they' don't know either) because the original guy that announced Monero, was thankful_for_today and he's no longer around. However, it does seem that the issuance schedule and Monero's does seem to match up so that both reach a total of 21 million coins in the future. This MAY be ...


7

From Wiki it says around 18.4 Million at the end of May 2022. However, tail emission will kick in after that which is 0.6 XMR, so it has no fixed limit. Its main emission curve will issue about 18.4 million coins to be mined in approximately 8 years. (more precisely 18.132 Million coins by ca. end of May 2022[) After that, a constant "tail emission" of ...


7

While running monerod, type in the following command: print_coinbase_tx_sum <start height> <block count> This will sum all the coinbase transaction outputs for the blocks defined by the arguments, while also showing how much is from emission and how much from fees. Example output of the command print_coinbase_tx_sum 0 1000: Sum of coinbase ...


5

Amichateur made a very informative post on Reddit with graphs making this comparison and an explanation of how FreeMat was used to calculate the data. 9.4 min Bitcoin block time (de-facto avg. time since inception) For comparability, Monero block reward shown relates to 9.4 minutes intervals. The vertical line indicates the start of Monero's tail ...


5

A mining arms race, like what Bitcoin has experienced in recent times could cause the date to be drawn closer, but probably not by much. Another thing that might cause the issuance to slow is if big blocks happen such that fees replace the block reward, as bigger blocks defer block rewards while the fees paying transactions are present. This second scenario ...


5

It must be impossible. The underlying math is such that it is provably impossible. So no, it's not theoretically possible. Theoretical possibility would mean a broken coin. I could imagine 2 ways to create coins in a TX: Successfully double-spend the same output. However, this is not possible because of the key images mechanism. Cheat the sum(in) == sum(...


5

This spreadsheet compares Monero's emission with that of Bitcoin. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qXi7zUSIh7F6UuSuhOryyFbHEy_LJuym3I3neAga_2s/edit#gid=239466694 Credit to luigi1111 for making this.


5

The daemon command print_coinbase_tx_sum is useful for auditing the supply (sum of all coinbase transactions). help print_coinbase_tx_sum Command usage: print_coinbase_tx_sum <start_height> [<block_count>] Command description: Print the sum of coinbase transactions. You then verify, the amount obtained from above, is less than per the ...


3

This is kind of a chicken and egg problem. For someone to come years later and wonder about this, the coin must be alive still. This means there must not have been any moment in its history where the vast majority of people thought there was no point mining this coin. This is the reason why there is more incentive given to early miners to support the coin, ...


3

As of 2018-08-01, circulating supply is around 6 million out of a total of about 184 million, which will be emitted over the course of 50 years with no tail emission after depletion. The block reward is about 170 WOW.


3

yshurik is correct, current emission is on https://moneroblocks.info/. In addition, total coins to be issues (eventually!) can be gotten from coinwarz: https://www.coinwarz.com/cryptocurrency/coins/monero (as well as much other useful info).


3

Actually just https://moneroblocks.info/ shows "Emission" in top right corner, so looks like it is about 14.9M


3

1) How can I get the amount for transaction fees in a potential block? The easiest method (and just using the RPC interface) to get the block emission separate to the tx fees is probably to subtract the last mined blocks emission (emission_amount of get_coinbase_tx_sum) from the expected_reward (of get_block_template). It's not perfectly accurate but ...


3

In this chart you can see a comparison of supply and monetary inflation (emission/supply) before Monero's tail emission commences at the end of May 2022. Dotted lines are target values, solid lines are actual values and dashed lines are expected future values. Here you can see an explanation of how Monero's emission curve is calculated. And here you can ...


3

Transaction fees does not disappear. They are earned by the miners as part of the block reward, so they stay in the available money supply.


2

Cant add to the comment, but like he was saying, the transaction fee does not disappear. Sure it's not awarded right away by your pool, but it's awarded to someone. If its 1000 block reward, then the total supply would go up by 1000, regardless of the fee.


2

You can see the emission curve here: https://i.imgur.com/Q9aHNIi.png It's essentially the same exponential decay as Monero, but stretched out over 50 years or so rather than 7 or 8 years for Monero. Also note that there is no tail emission. It is calculated from the source code. You can get the function here: https://github.com/wownero/wownero/blob/...


2

There is one: http://moneroblocks.info/richlist Spoiler: it's empty. Quoting the site: C'mon man. Really? I thought you knew... Monero is fundamentally private Really. It is. It is based in the Cryptonote protocol. It uses unique one-time addresses for each transaction so that only the receiver knows where the money went. This is good, believe me. And, as ...


1

There is the get_coinbase_tx_sum RPC call which takes height and count parameters, and returns how many moneros were created between block height and block height + count. So by setting height to zero and count to the current block height, you get the current money supply (the daemon might take some time to compute everything at once though).


1

As of august 2017, total emission is approximately 14.962175 million monero (), increasing at a rate of roughly 4780 (720 times the current block reward of about 6.64 monero) monero a day. https://moneroblocks.info/tx/2b192d6739c31cf973cdec78a715724ef56e3d16090e6d1fd1a58efcdadbb359 is the current top block for reference. This page shows both current emission ...


1

It is already designed to be an unlimited supply. After the mining reward drops below .3 then Monero starts generating .3 monero a minute to help pay the miners off. Around 18 million Monero issued this happens, resulting in ".85%" increase in supply that slowly drops (the percentage) as Monero mining runs out of newly mined coins and this .3 Monero ...


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