9

I will first quote the abstract of MRL-0006 draft by kenshi84: In the CryptoNote protocol, wallet addresses never appear in the blockchain, protecting users' privacy from blockchain analysis. However, wallet addresses are inevitably known to senders and can be kept by them locally, which may become privacy concerns. Consider a typical example: a user buys ...


7

There are disposable addresses and subaddresses. Subaddresses are cool because you can have different addresses and still have them go to the same wallet. But they wouldn't be linked together. As pebx mentioned, there is a limit on the amount of subaddresses. You can generate as many subaddresses as you want, but the wallet cache file size gets bigger and ...


6

I will quote some comments from kenshi84 (who submitted the pull request). Subaddresses are just like the standard address that you can use for receiving funds repeatedly. For example, you can use subaddress of index=1 for receiving your salary and index=2 for raising funds for your secret project, and no one can find the link between them. The number of ...


6

Disposable addresses require the sender to use an unencrypted payment id specified by the receiver. This means that if funds are sent to a disposable address more than once, an observer can tell that two transactions on the blockchain have the same recipient because both transactions will share the same payment id. It may have been difficult to educate ...


3

No. Given an output pubkey P in a new transaction with its tx pubkey being R, you can recognize it as your incoming transfer by using your private viewkey a, looking for P - Hs(a*R)*G in your hashtable and finding an entry recoding the sub-address's index j. Its private key P=x*G is obtained as x = Hs(a*R) + b + Hs(a || j). So you need both of the original ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible