10

Right now there are two primary ways to do so: Go to the folder containing monero-wallet-cli and run "./monero-wallet-cli --restore-deterministic-wallet", entering your mnemonic seed when prompted. NOTE that this will simply restore your wallet keys. You will still need to scan a blockchain (either your local blockchain or a remote blockchain) to see your ...


10

TL;DR first is completely random seed, 2nd is the "normalized" seed, and they're both valid and resolve to the same wallet. As long as you know the method to go from mnemonic to the actual private key, you're safe to keep it as it is. The first is a just some random 256 bits, probably generated by other means and the second is the "normalized" seed, meaning ...


7

The encryption used by the keys file is randomized. It uses a key derived from your password, and an IV (initialization vector) which is randomly selected. This is designed to prevent an adversary from determining which parts of the file are the same, and which are different, if you encrypt two files (or two versions of the same file) with the same password. ...


6

This answer just reiterates the point Jolly Mort made above with a reference example. The answer to your question concerns the Monero normalization function sc_reduce32() plays when it operates on a seed to create the effective private spend key. Normalized numbers fed to the sc_reduce32() function won't be modified. (Note the example key below is not a ...


6

The wallet.keys file has the date embedded so the md5sum will change every time you restore with --restore-deterministic-wallet Yes your wallet is deterministic. The new md5sum is no cause for concern because as explained by fluffyponyza: If you got the same address then it restored both your view and spend keys perfectly. Remember that this is not ...


6

There's a really nice description and address generation tool here: https://xmr.llcoins.net/addresstests.html I believe that site is owned and maintained by core dev person luigi1111. Long quote from luigi's page: Cryptonote Public Addresses differ in several ways compared to Bitcoin. First, Cryptonote uses two keypairs, known as the spend keypair ...


5

You need the dictionary, yes. Each word is a representation of a number, and that number is the index of the word in the dictionary. Each triplet of words maps (via their indices in the dictionary) to a 32 bit number. Use 8 of them, and you get your 256 bit seed as a bitstring. The private spend key is the first 128 whole 256 bits (see luigi's comment below)...


5

There are several ways to do this. Choose a method below. I recommend following the steps for the GUI. Graphical User Interface (GUI) You can import into the GUI during the initial setup with ease. After selecting your language, select the middle option as shown below: Command Line Wallet (CLI) This page on the Monero website gives a great overview of ...


2

I understand that the mnemonic is enough to recover the wallet. How are the keys and address generated from there? The seed mnemonic is a wallet convention thing, and any wallet can have its own if you will. The protocol doesn't care about mnemonic or seed. All you need protocol-wise is a private spend key and a private view key, where a private key is just ...


1

This is most likely the bug fixed in https://github.com/monero-project/monero/pull/2542. If you can't or won't patch your copy to include this small fix, a workaround is to ensure you have a synced daemon when you create the wallet, so that monero-wallet-cli can access it to query the current blockchain height.


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