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18

Note that, if you are stuck on block 1288639 (or block 1400001) or a few blocks later, you are using a wrong, outdated, version and you should upgrade to the latest version, which can be found here. In addition, this won't require a resync from scratch, as the "new" monerod will automatically use the blockchain that was used with the previous version and ...


9

It's a two way connection, the IN refers to connections initiated by the peer, and OUT refers to connections initiated by your node, but communication is duplex. In that status command, the X+Y part is X OUT connections and Y in connections. You're connected to all of these nodes, the only difference is which side initiated the connection.


8

As someone who runs both Windows and Linux, I'd say that there is no bad choice but there certainly are better ones for specific use cases. Casual use: Windows - no need to dual boot or learn a new OS. Mining, running a full node work fine. Competitive mining: Linux for superior performance Storing funds: Linux for superior security. (Still requires sane ...


7

The disconnected architecture that Monero employs allows you to host the daemon and wallet separately. My own opinion is that this is an improvement over the bundled design of Bitcoin-QT. If you connect your wallet to a remote daemon, or don't host your own node, there are security and performance implications. If you run the daemon locally, there's a ...


6

There are two new optional parameters for the start_mining command. Before: start_mining [address] [threads] Now: start_mining [address] [threads] [do_smart_mining] [ignore_battery] If you pass the value "true" to the do_smart_mining parameter, then mining will only be activated when you're computer is idle AND plugged into a power source, and will only ...


6

This is a basic networking question, not specific to Monero. 0.0.0.0 means "any address" - it will bind to every network interface on the machine. So it will listen to requests from anywhere. Using a specific address means it will only bind to that single address. Using 127.0.0.1 is the loopback address, so it will only listen to requests originating on ...


6

Yes. That is normal. Some of the nodes you connect to will be running old versions of Monero with outdated blokchains. Your daemon should eventually block some of these automatically. As long as it can reach a peer with a current copy of the blockchain, then there are no problems. See here for more details.


6

That's a pretty broad question... If you just want to run a full node, I would recommend some (small) VPS on Linux, since even 20GB of storage space will be enough and you will be able to run it with any amount of RAM will be OK for that purpose. If you want to mine and involve your GPU, I would prefer Windows, since GPU drivers are usually better than on ...


6

2017-11-27 21:26:00.492 3056 WARN blockchain.db.lmdb src/blockchain_db/lmdb/db_lmdb.cpp:72 Failed to query m_blocks: MDB_BAD_TXN: Transaction must abort, has a child, or is invalid This indicates that your blockchain is corrupted. You can first try to fix this as follows: Windows Browse to the directory monerod.exe is located. Open a new command ...


5

If your daemon was interrupted by a power failure or OS crash, and it was still trying to catch up to the network (as opposed to already being synchronized), there's a chance the DB got corrupted. If you get a DB error after starting after a crash, you should try using this flag. You should only use this flag after you've already seen a DB error that causes ...


5

The getbklocktemplate RPC returns a blockhashing_blob and a blocktemplate_blob. You can either try to find a nonce (4 bytes) by mining using the blockhashing_blob, or you can try to find two nonces (4 bytes in the block header, reserved_size bytes in the extra field of the mining reward transaction) using the blocktemplate_blob and computing the transaction ...


5

An oversimplified explanation is as follows: Bitmain, an ASIC manufacturer, created a Cryptonight ASIC. This enabled the company to "control" a large portion of the Monero hash rate and consequently mine many coins. When The Monero Project learned about this, it modified the Cryptonight proof-of-work (PoW) so that any previously-created ASIC's would be ...


4

Pretty sure that's how it works. You can also use the command "status" and you'll see at the end of the line a number like "8+1" this shows the number of nodes you are connected to, and after the + shows the number of nodes you are serving.


4

If the blockchain is behind and synchronizing, then definitely. When it is fully synchronized, the usage should drop to 0-10%, even on a HDD.


4

Having a partially synced chain does not mean unreliability. It might be that these nodes are syncing the chain, as you presumably did at some point too. Banning these nodes would mean noone can start using Monero, and would cause the network to die off from attrition. In order to get incoming connections (currently none, as the 8+0 shows), you need to ...


4

The difference between JSON RPCs and binary RPCs is the format of the data in the HTTP POST request and in the server's answer. JSON RPCs use strings representing JSON objects. Binary RPCs use a "portable binary storage" serialization (it starts with the header 011101010101020101 and the data is organized in a kind of tree that can contain sections, ...


4

Sounds like you're on an old release. The current version (v0.10.3.1) doesn't bounce around like that on reporting sync state any more.


4

I just downloaded the Monerujo wallet and trying to figure it out. Is there an instructions page? Yes. Read the README, FAQ. As this app is still in APK form and not released to the app store, use caution and read the disclaimer: You may lose all your Moneroj if you use this App. Be cautious when spending on the mainnet. For maximum privacy, connect to ...


4

Unfortunately, this looks like a corrupt blockchain database. With 0.11.0.0, monerod has a --db-salvage option which might be able to recover your database. Exit monerod, and run it again with that option appended, eg: ./monerod --db-salvage. Otherwise, the only fix for tis is to exit monerod, delete the blockchain (~/.bitmonero/lmdb/data.mdb) and start ...


4

The extra reserved bytes are taken into consideration to compute the block hash. There are 4 bytes reserved for a nonce in the block header (the nonce that appears in the hashing blob). In addition, you can reserve extra bytes (reserve_size) for a second nonce in the extra field of the block reward transaction. It allows searching for a nonce giving a ...


4

You can use monero-blockchain-import to import a raw blockchain file, wherever it comes from, including from your own web server. However, monero-blockchain-import does not support reading from the network directly, it must import from a file (and will make two passes over it, if memory serves). One possibility is to temporarily mount a partition from your ...


4

Your understanding is correct: outgoing connections are initiated by you, incoming connections are initiated by the peer. You can certainly have a peer syncing from you via an outgoing connection though. The 800 connections is just a bug in the accounting. They're not all actual connections. You can see that using netstat or similar tool. When a node is ...


4

The only metric that the daemon is giving me is the number of incoming/outgoing connections, without differentiating between wallet connections and P2P connections. That's not correct, the daemon does differentiate: those are all P2P connections. Recent daemons do report the number of RPC connections in the getinfo RPC, in the rpc_connections_count field. ...


3

An old experiment of alternative implementation of Monero can be https://github.com/monero-project/mininero It's not an alternative for Monero but an alternative for RingCT transactions.


3

As others have stated, having a separate blockchain daemon and wallet application is a strategic design decision. Here's a comment from Wladimir J. van der Laan, Bitcoin Core Maintainer: To name an example of it done right, IMO: Monero's 'simplewallet'. It is a command-line utility wallet that communicates with the node software, and remembers where ...


3

There are two main reasons a program can not bind to a socket: the port is already used: typically, for the Monero daemon, this means another monerod is already running. You can check whether monerod is running by looking at the process list (ps, top, or other tool), or whether monerod or another program is already bound on that socket using netstat -ntpa (...


3

simple answer is those nodes are on a different, longer chain. how your node decides which chain is the "correct" chain, I don't know that answer.


3

Not sure random debug log questions are on topic for stack exchange, but... Field 2 is the thread logging this message. Hop is the (untrusted) number of peers forwarding the object. COMMAND_TIMED_SYNC is one of the P2P traffic messages.


3

p2pstate.bin is stored in ~/.bitmonero on Linux and Mac. On Windows it's stored in C:\ProgramData\bitmonero. However, the gotcha in the link you gave no longer applies: the node ID is now regenerated at random at each daemon start. Therefore, deleting the p2pstate.bin file is not necessary for that reason. It might theoretically be used to fingerprint you ...


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