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6

The seed is all you need to restore the wallet. Write it down on a piece of paper. If you want to backup the full wallet history (i.e which addresses you have sent transactions to, and the tx key for each transaction) you need to backup the wallet files. They are usualy located in Documents/Monero on windows, if you didn't choose another location when you ...


6

You can use any of those methods: backup the mnemonic seed, a 25 word list of words that encode your private keys. This is the simplest way, and you can then restore your wallet with monero-wallet-cli --restore-deterministic-wallet later. After creating a wallet, you can obtain its seed with the seed command in monero-wallet-cli. backup the keys file and ...


4

Go to settings on the left-hand side. Then click on the third menu item on the top called "Show seed & keys". It will ask for your wallet password and then give you all you need to restore your wallet in the future. See below image for help.


4

Write down your 25 word seed. That is all you need to restore your wallet and all your funds if any disaster occurs. If you didn't write it down at the time of wallet creation, simply type "seed" into the wallet command line. Obviously, keep your seed in a safe place.


3

I think you know the answer to that one, since you say "because they are neither stored in the blockchain nor computable from blockchain data, but only kept locally in the wallet cache". The answer is: make backups. Backups can be stored on inexpensive write once media, and both encrypted and signed. Of course, make sure your only copy of the keys isn't ...


3

I see no correlation or problem with upgrading your OS as related to Monero and I can think of no reason why the upgrade would create any problems for your Monero. As you have your mnemonic backed up, you are safe either way. However, I hope you have taken time to set your "privacy" settings on Ubuntu. Contrary to other Linux distros, there is a little bit ...


2

You should back up the ~/.bitmonero directory (which contains the blockchain) and your wallet files (the <wallet name>, <wallet name>.keys, and (though not needed) <wallet name>.txt. Aside from that, there's little to worry about.


2

As long as you have the wallet's 25-word mnemonic in a safe place, you cannot lose any funds, even if you remove all the wallet directories. Because, you can always recreate the wallet with the mnemonic. Of course, when doing that, you'd need to rescan the blockchain. However, keep in mind that only the wallet you're sending transactions from, keeps a cache ...


2

Once you have lots of people using your cryptocurrency, you can back up nothing at all (I'm talking about not backing up your seed nodes. If you have a wallet, you'll want to keep the mnemonic seed for that backed up, of course. And you'll want to keep a safe copy of your passwords/private keys that are used for connecting to the server via SSH and for ...


2

First off, the node does not do anything about addresses, the wallet does. The node never gets your secret keys. Next, the Monero wallet will always cache/calculate the next 200 addresses for the next 50 accounts. Every time you receive monero in one of these, the Monero wallet will cache/calculate more of these to always keep a buffer of 200/50 beyond the "...


1

Perhaps I could run two instances of monerod on the same machine, with settings that cause one of my disks to synchronize against the other; but I don't know what command-line arguments to use. Can someone provide an example? If you start a second monerod instance like: monerod --p2p-bind-port 38080 --rpc-bind-port 38081 --zmq-rpc-bind-port 38082 \ --...


1

Your funds are not stored on your laptop, they're stored on the blockchain. Copies of the blockchain are stored on perhaps hundreds of thousands of computers all over the world. What you need to keep safe is your Monero seed. This is the credential that you use to scan the blockchain to see what funds have been sent to you, and to prove you have the right ...


1

You can write down the appropriate addresses and put it in a safe. If you want to make a safe backup of your wallet, look for a few ways of securely saving your wallet information, but make as much effort as possible to make these backups only accessible to you.


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