17

Even FPGA would be expensive for CryptoNight because most standard FPGA have close to zero memory. Your second point will, therefore, not only decrease the relative advantage of ASICs or FPGA over GPUs and CPUs but greatly increase their cost. Even a basic FPGA mining board would be an expensive custom job because of this memory requirement. I would ...


15

Cryptonight (the PoW hash used by Monero and most Cryptonote coins) does not lend itself well to ASIC development, for the following reasons: Cryptonight requires 2 MB of fast memory to work. This means that parallelizing hashes is limited by how much memory can be crammed in a chip while keeping cheap enough to be worth it. 2 MB of memory takes a lot more ...


7

In versions 1 to 6 of the protocol, the CryptoNight algorithm was very roughly: state = keccak(block_data) scratchpad = fill_scratchpad(state) loop 524,288 times address = compute_address(scratchpad, state) modification1(scratchpad, address) address = compute_address(scratchpad, state) modification2(scratchpad, address) text = reduce(scratchpad, ...


6

Centralization is a continuum. Actions and circumstances move a particular system along that continuum. There are several points which are topical here: Monero development is made by a smallish number of people (more centralized) Anybody with skills is free to join Monero development (less centralized) A single party being able to dictate what gets mined ...


5

No, not at all. Bitcoin ASICs are designed with the singular purpose of performing Sha-256 hashing - it's literally written in the silicon. Monero uses the Cryptonight hash function which makes use of AES encryption and several hashing algorithms, Keccak, Blake-256, JH-256, Groestl-256, and Skein-256. Reference: https://cryptonote.org/cns/cns008.txt


5

Monero is not immune to ASICs in the future, but the costs of manufacturing ASICs is offset by the block rewards such that it would not be profitable. ASIC manufacturing would need to get cheaper, or the value of XMR would need to skyrocket for people to even consider ASIC mining. As I understand it, Monero's POW requires 2mb to perform hashing, and ASIC ...


3

What are the main differences between ProgPOW and RandomX? The design goal of ProgPoW is to have the algorithm’s requirements match what is available on commodity GPUs, while RandomX is inefficient (as stated on https://github.com/tevador/RandomX) on GPUs. can some parts of it also benefit Monero's development in a longer-term ASIC resistant mining ...


3

At block 1788000, Monero will switch PoW from CryptoNight variant 2 to variant 4 The current naming is a little misleading as we are really on variant 3 right now, with the next being variant 4. This is because variant 2 actually spanned 2 releases in quick succession. Naming aside... How is that second goal technically achieved in practice ? The best ...


2

The idea behind this draft is more like an extension to PoW changes like currently to prevent ASICs overtaking a serious amount of hash rate. However, it's proposing to time lock all mining rewards during a full period of time where one algorithm is active, between two PoW hard forks and release them only after another challenge period which might be 1-3 ...


2

The fork was moved to today (April 6, 2018), so it is hard to tell. Early indications based on block-times are about 80% of the hash-rate is missing. Some of that is non-ASIC miners failing to update on time. We should know more in a week or so.


1

"Specialized nodes that act as middlemen" defeats the entire purpose of PoW, which is decentralization.


1

Do we know who exactly created these asics during the big hash run up during 2019-Jan to 2019-Mar? It's hard to say, but the names are the usual known. And why would they create these asics, when they know for a fact that the monero community would easily fork the algo to brick all of their asics. It just doesn't make sense why they would spend so ...


1

As of writing this answer (2018-04-07 03:00 UTC), ~18.5 hours after network upgrade, there are 65 blocks mined (latest is 1546065). It takes on average 17 minutes to mine a block, which is 8.5 times the expected 2 minutes. The difficulty is calculated based on past 720 blocks. However not all blocks are used. DiffCut: the number of highest and lowest ...


1

The network hash rate was around 1123 MH/s at the time of the fork. The difficulty hasn't changed yet, so blocks are coming in much slower(lower hash rate at same "asic difficulty"), and while it will slowly decrease with each new block, it will take 720 blocks before the true adjustment takes place(a few more days at minimum). As the difficulty is a ...


1

Bitmain Introduce Cryptonight ASIC https://shop.bitmain.com/productDetail.htm?pid=000201803132107063379CD35Gxy064F


1

Baikal has delivered an ASIC miner which is for sale on their web site here: http://www.baikalminer.com/product12.php


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