The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 7493

Security issues with the design or implementation of Monero and related crypto-currencies.

1
vote
Level of privacy is a sliding scale and goes far beyond just Monero usage. E.g. you immediately lose some privacy by using a KYC exchange (as per your first step), which has nothing to do with the pri …
answered May 23 by jtgrassie
1
vote
Monero does not implement SSL in the RPC but it's super simple to enable if you really want to open up a remote node with encrypted communication. Some options are: Connect via an SSH tunnel Proxy …
answered May 18 '18 by jtgrassie
3
votes
H can be verified by seeing how it's computed in the unit tests: key G = scalarmultBase(d2h(1)); key H = hashToPointSimple(G); When conducting the Bulletproof audit, the QuarksLab team dug into the …
answered Jan 18 by jtgrassie
2
votes
It seems that blockchain code written in C++ is prone to obscure but serious bugs Well, anything coded in anything can be "prone to obscure but serious bugs", it's not the language used that's at …
answered Feb 3 by jtgrassie
1
vote
No, a remote node cannot determine your wallet address. However, using a 3rd party remote node, you are trusting the remote node operator to not: log your usage (e.g. IP analysis), trusting that the …
answered Jun 4 by jtgrassie
1
vote
Details of multisig in the answers to this question: How to Use Monero Multisignature Wallets (2/2 & 2/3) But no, actual signing doesn't need to be done while online.
answered Jun 8 '18 by jtgrassie
3
votes
Safety is a scale relative to your requirements. If the remote node is not your own remote node, you are trusting that remote node to a) not censor you by not relaying transactions or send you blocks …
answered Jan 4 by jtgrassie
1
vote
How much more entropy does a 9 digit pin (Trezor) offer compared to a 4 digit pin (Ledger Nano S)? Given entropy per symbol (0-9) is 3.322 source you get 13.328 for 4 digits and 29.898 for 9 digi …
answered May 24 '18 by jtgrassie
0
votes
The proofs would be 1) a multisig 2-2 transaction initially created on the main-chain and 2) the multiple parties signing (to spend agreed balances) at settlement. What happens on the side-chain is ir …
answered May 23 '18 by jtgrassie
0
votes
The website URL is correct. Once you've downloaded, you can check against the supplied hash and verify the signature of the hashes list. Details on the releases page of the project (where you can also …
answered Mar 19 by jtgrassie
1
vote
into the wallet and all the communication to Bitmessage, thus a secure channel of communication. So, Will the Multisig Messaging System improve Monero security and performance? It provides a … secure way of transferring multisig files between participants, not more generally improving Monero security. Performance wise, it's probably right now slower than other ways (due to the PyBitmessage …
answered Jan 11 by jtgrassie
1
vote
There are detailed instructions for using Monero over TOR on the project homepage: https://github.com/monero-project/monero#using-tor. Essentially to use the GUI wallet over TOR, you'd need to have a …
answered Jul 17 '18 by jtgrassie
1
vote
In it's simplest form, a hardware wallet is for holding your private keys on a non-internet connected device. It is also designed to be easy to use with your internet connected machine whereby it can …
answered Jan 14 by jtgrassie
0
votes
Yes, it would weaken your privacy. By knowing when you transacted, an attacker can narrow down the field of which possible outputs you own, thus increasing their capability to trace your past and futu …
answered Apr 7 by jtgrassie
2
votes
The third point is about general operating system security with regards to which system users have read, write and executable permissions on files and folders in the kovri data path. setfacl (or …
answered May 23 '18 by jtgrassie