According to the release notes GUI v0.12.3.0 includes Ledger support. How do I generate a Ledger Monero wallet with the GUI (monero-wallet-gui)?

  • It is necessary to export the private key to use the wallet normally, that is, I really do not understand the difference between the two options, I would appreciate a response, thank you in advance. – Darik González Aug 15 at 21:31
  • What part of the explanation in the guide do you not understand? – dEBRUYNE Aug 16 at 15:02
up vote 8 down vote accepted

We first have to ensure that we're sufficiently prepared. This entails the following:

Windows

  1. This guide assumes you have already initialized your Ledger wallet and thus generated a 24 word mnemonic seed.

  2. You need to run / use GUI v0.13.0.4, which can be found here, on the downloads page of the official website, or on Github.

  3. You need to install the Ledger Monero app.

  4. Your Ledger needs to be plugged in and the Ledger Monero app should be running.

Mac OS X

  1. This guide assumes you have already initialized your Ledger wallet and thus generated a 24 word mnemonic seed.

  2. You need to run / use GUI v0.13.0.4, which can be found here, on the downloads page of the official website, or on Github.

  3. You need to install the Ledger Monero app.

  4. Your Ledger needs to be plugged in and the Ledger Monero app should be running.

Linux

  1. This guide assumes you have already initialized your Ledger wallet and thus generated a 24 word mnemonic seed.

  2. You need to run / use GUI v0.13.0.4, which can be found here, on the downloads page of the official website, or on Github.

  3. You need to install the Ledger Monero app.

  4. You need to install the package listed here.

  5. You may have to add some udev-rules. A script can be found here.

  6. Your Ledger needs to be plugged in and the Ledger Monero app should be running.

Now that we're sufficiently prepared, let's start! Note that the following instructions are general. If anything is OS specific I'll mention it explicitly.

  1. Browse to the directory / folder GUI v0.13.0.4 is located.

  2. Open v0.13.0.4 monero-wallet-gui.app (Mac OS X) or monero-wallet-gui.exe (Windows) or monero-wallet-gui (Linux).

  3. If it tries to open an existing wallet, click on the Cancel button. This will bring you back to the wizard.

  4. On the first page of the wizard, select your desired language.

  5. On the second page of the wizard, choose Create a new wallet from hardware device

  6. Enter a new Wallet name

  7. In the Restore height (optional) box enter 1670000 | Whilst this value is optional, I'd strongly advise to set it. If not set (properly), it will result in terrible user experience.

  8. In the Subaddress lookahead (optional) box enter 3:100

  9. Make sure the Device name is set to Ledger

  10. Go to the next page.

  11. The Ledger will ask whether you want to export the private view key or not. First and foremost, your funds cannot be compromised with merely the private view key. Exporting the private view key enables the client (on the computer - Monero v0.13.0.4) to scan blocks looking for transactions that belong to your wallet / address. If this option is not utilized, the device (Ledger) will scan blocks, which will be significantly slower. There is, however, one caveat. That is, if your system gets compromised, the adversary will potentially be able to compromise your private view key as well, which is detrimental to privacy. This is virtually impossible when the private view key is not exported.

  12. You may have to hit confirm twice before it proceeds.

  13. Your Ledger Monero wallet will now be generated. Note that this may take up to a few minutes. Furthermore, there will be no immediate feedback in the GUI nor on the Ledger.

  14. Enter a password for your wallet and proceed to the next page.

  15. On the Daemon settings page you basically have three options. First, you can simply run a local node. This entails performing the full blockchain sync, which may take from 10-14 hours (with an SSD) to several days to complete (with an HDD). Second, you can run a local node and make use of a bootstrap node. This also entails performing the full blockchain sync. However, this option allows you to immediately use the wallet whilst your local node performs the initial blockchain sync in the background. Third, you can use a remote node, which allows you to immediately use the wallet. Using your own (local) node is most advantageous with respect to privacy and security plus it contributes to the strength and decentralization of the network. It, however, requires approximately 60 GB of free space. Furthermore, performing the initial blockchain sync is quite resource intensive and may cause the GUI to feel laggy / buggy. Although, this can be mitigated by applying this guide. Now, practically speaking, you can choose option 1 by leaving all boxes blank and, optionally, specifying a custom Blockchain location. Option 2 is chosen by entering a remote node (a list of remote nodes can be found here in the Bootstrap node box. Option 3 is chosen by first ticking the Connect to a remote node box and subsequently entering a remote node (to reiterate, a list of remote nodes can be found here.

  16. Go to the next page, which will provide an overview.

  17. Press Use Monero.

  18. Congratulations, you can now use your Ledger Monero wallet in conjunction with the GUI.


A few final notes:

  1. I'd strongly advise to test the full process first. That is, send a small amount to the wallet and subsequently restore it (using aforementioned guide) to verify that you can recover the wallet.

  2. The wallet files are, by default, stored in /Users/<username>/Monero/<wallet-name> (Mac OS X) or Documents\Monero\<wallet-name> (Windows) or /home/<username>/Monero/<wallet-name> (Linux).

  3. The .keys wallet file stored on your system contains some settings related to the wallet, your public keys, and your private view key in case you exported it. It does not contain your private spend key. Put differently, the private spend key remains on the Ledger device.

  4. You only have to use this guide once (i.e. upon wallet creation). Thereafter, you'd basically use it similar to how you normally use the GUI. That is:

[1] Make sure your Ledger is plugged in and the Monero app is running.

[2] Open GUI v0.13.0.4.

[3] Enter the password to open the wallet.

[4] Optionally export the private view key on the Ledger device.

  1. It's imperative that the closing process of your Ledger Monero wallet is done in this specific consecutive order:

[1] Exit the GUI by clicking on the x (right top).

[2] Exit the Ledger Monero app.

[3] Unplug the Ledger device.

  1. If you have any further questions or need assistance, please leave a comment in this thread.

dEBRUYNE's guide is comprehensive but for Windows 7 users you may run into an error along the lines of:

failed to generate new wallet: Fail SCard API : (-2146435026) 0x8010002E Device=0, hCard=0, hContext=14771806782070194176

The problem: You need to update your Drivers and it's not easy to see this issue. This is a compilation of the solutions I found from various threads:

In the device manager, under Universal Serial Bus controllers, one of the drivers the ledger will show up as is a USB Composite Device. Go to update the driver, but when doing so, search for the driver under C:\Windows\winsxs. After doing this the device should show up under Smart card readers as a Microsoft Usbccid Smartcard Reader (WUDF).

After the driver is updated the device does not show up as a Smart Card Reader unless the Monero app is open on the Ledger.

If your nano does not appear under Universal Serial Bus controllers it may be listed elsewhere. Find out by following the below steps (It's possible your options under hardware tab may be different than mine, if so please reply):

Devices and Printers and right clicking Nano > Properties > Hardware tab it will display:

HID Compliant Device

USB Input Device

Now you need to update the driver in Device Manager by expanding Human Interface Devices > USB Input Device and right click your nano driver (Matching the ID in Devices and Printers if you're not sure which one it is) and click properties and select the Drivers tab and Update Driver and search for the driver under this folder C:\Windows\winsxs

The original answer was written here: https://github.com/monero-project/monero/issues/4187#issuecomment-409088700 by TheRealDarkhorse702

Adding a small guide for Manjaro Linux users here (and possibly other Arch-based systems as well) as the process is a bit different than how it is explained in:

https://github.com/LedgerHQ/blue-app-monero/blob/master/doc/user/bolos-app-monero.pdf

specifically part 3.2.1.

The guide tells you to install the following packages: "pcsc-tools" "pcscd" and "libpcsclite1:amd64". However on Manjaro I found that two of these do not exist in the repositories."pcsc-tools" package is there so you can just go ahead and install it. A package called "pcsclite" was already installed on my system and can otherwise be installed from the repo. "pcscd" and "libpcsclite1:amd64" however are missing. This means that there most likely is no file called "libccid_info.plist"and this file is needed and has to be configured as described in the guide.

What I did was to install the package called "ccid" and also a package called "opensc". Not entirely sure if both are needed and you could try to get the wallet working with only one of them, mainly I believe that it was "ccid" that made it work. If uncertain just install both as I did.

Then go ahead and add the lines as described in

https://github.com/LedgerHQ/blue-app-monero/blob/master/doc/user/bolos-app-monero.pdf section 3.2.1.

to /etc/"libccid_info.plist"

Finally I had to start the daemon "pcscd" because on my system it did not start automatically.

"sudo systemctl start pcscd.service" should do the trick.

If you want the service to start auto at boot the command would be:

"sudo systemctl enable pcscd.service"

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