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Is there a transaction that makes use of the tx_extra field that is viewable in the monero block explorer?

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Using the example from this question's answer, and following jtgrassie's recommendation to use https://xmrchain.com with "More Details" -> "Show JSON representation of tx", the tx extra field can be found in here.

EDIT: better instructions

  1. Go to https://xmrchain.com
  2. Enter the transaction hash you want to look up, e.g. the example here
  3. Go to bottom of page and click on "More Details"
  4. Go to bottom of page again and click on "Show JSON representation of tx"
  5. At bottom of page there is the entire transaction in JSON format. Tx_extra field is labeled "extra":
  6. See this other question for details about the extra field.
  • Which section of the json should I be looking at? Or is that entire json sent into tx_extra? – Patoshi パトシ Jan 15 at 16:38
  • If you go to the bottom of the link there is a 'Show JSON representation of tx' button, click it and the entire transaction will be shown. Field 'extra' is the tx_extra. – koe Jan 16 at 16:04
  • Ok i see it! It shows: 1, 240, 78, 249, 111, 229, 39, 232, 253, 137, 61, 146, .... Does extra have to be in hex or can it be ascii? – Patoshi パトシ Jan 16 at 16:49
  • Extra is just a series of bytes, it can be whatever you want. See the other question for details. monero.stackexchange.com/questions/11888/… – koe Jan 16 at 19:31
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Is there an example of a transaction that makes use of tx_extra field? Is this public unencrypted data?

Every transaction makes use of tx extra as it places the tx public key in there. The data is public but can be encrypted (e.g. payment IDs are encrypted in extra).

...that is viewable in the monero block explorer?

Select a transaction in https://testnet.xmrchain.com or https://xmrchain.com and click "More Details" at the bottom, then "Show JSON representation of tx".

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